Nursing Home wants to accommodate new roommate. How is this taking mom into consideration?

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Mom has profound hearing loss and end stage COPD on a high flow oxygen concentrator that up until yesterday was kept in the bathroom due to the amount of heat it puts out. The social services gal came to Mom's room and said she has to have the oxygen moved to her side of the room, as threading tubing around new roommate's area to Mom's area is now a safety violation. I asked why they were able to do so with other roommates she's had, but now she has to have it right there where it creates enormous amounts of heat and noise- neither of which were considered when the roommate was moved in. I feel that they are penalizing my Mom with their prior violations, her own health will be compromised with breathing and she cannot hear anyone by phone call or visiting in such noise. Her options are to suck it up or move to other side of room to put oxygen back in bathroom. Threading it around the roommates bed to my Mom's area is hardly unsafe but apparently a violation to do so. If that is how they pair seniors together the details and needs of each were dismissed. So for the weekend we will see if my Mom can handle the condition or give up and be moved. How is this taking her lung condition into consideration? Mom's 98 and can't get a chance to relax and be able to adopt when they pull another stunt. State DHS needs this one.

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I am surprised they were allowed to do this in the first place. This is a hazard. I see no reason why Mom's bed can't be changed to be closer to the bathroom. Actually, the further Mom is away from the unit, the less oxygen she gets.
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Regulations are regulations; the facility cannot violate them without putting their license at risk. If you can't afford a private room, would they approve having the concentrator in the bathroom if your mom switches beds with the roommate?
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Perhaps a private room would solve the problem.
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Speaking from experience, being close to an oxygen concentrator isn't miserable, but it can be unpleasant, not only from the heat but the sound. It's not loud, but it's consistent, and always on. I've wondered if my own hearing has been affected.

I haven't raised this issue with our supplier, but I'm wondering if there is any way to deflect the heat or sound? I assume the concentrator is provided and maintained (and that's important as well) by the staff, so you might want to get the name and model number of the concentrator and call the manufacturer directly to ask about these issues.

I don't have any good suggestions, but just wanted to support your concern for the noise aspect, especially the ability to hear phone calls, visitors or medical personnel who periodically stop by.
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Cwillie has it buttoned up..
I have a concentrater and it does give off heat and noise but when I travel i can cope with it in the same room. Is there any reason Mom can't have the bed by the bathroom. Perhaps she has a window now but would loose it. Oxygen tubing is very flexible and would fit under a bathroom door.

Tubing snaking round a room is definitely a safety hazard so I see the staff's point of view. They really do have to minimize the risk of falls.

I am sure there is a solution if you just discuss it with the administration.
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O2 compressors can be a pain but your mother is hardly the first person at the facility to have one, how do others deal with it? I can certainly understand the concerns of mom's roommate, aside from having your mom's tubing snaking around her bed how easily is she able to use the bathroom with the compressor taking up space or shut the door for privacy? The roommate is new and just settling in and getting her bearings, it could be that once the equipment is moved she will see that both solutions have drawbacks and is willing to go reconsider to the previous arrangement.
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I'm not sure I follow, but would it be terribly inconvenient to move your mom closer to the bathroom to accommodate the oxygen?
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