Can a nursing home take my Mom's mobile home to help pay for costs? - AgingCare.com

Can a nursing home take my Mom's mobile home to help pay for costs?

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My mother lives with me and I am her primary care provider. She has been on Medicaid since 1999 (I think; I know it was the '90s). Everyone in the community knows this: neighbors, friends, family, her doctors, etc. I own the land our mobile home is on. She gave it to me about 14 years ago. So the land is in my name. However, the mobile home we live in - which sits ON my land - is in her name. If she has to go to a nursing home, can they take the mobile home?

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Can you afford a session with an eldercare lawyer? Rules vary from State to State so it is not possible to offer advice that is relaible.
The land is in your name so there is no concern there. I live in NYS and have known children of homeowners who have both gone into a nursing home be able to remain in the home. I don't know what happens if they move out. There are so many questions here for you but I personally would be very optimistic about the outcome for you. Good luck
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Thank you all for your very kind responses, and taking the time to even read and respond. I appreciate it so much. (I would say 'More than you know,' but I'm betting that since you are all also on here, you've been in my shoes in one way or another.) True, mobile homes depreciate in value VERY QUICKLY; I tried to talk my parents into building a log home but my mother wouldn't hear of it. She liked the idea of getting something new immediately. I guess. LOL My dad is still alive, but he is in terrible health too. My mom is hurting herself more and more each day caring for him, and she has lupus, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, severe depression and anxiety, etc. My dad can't walk. He can just stand to get out of bed, into his scooter, rude to his lift chair, and periodically throughout the day he gets into his scooter to ride around in the house a bit (mostly to the kitchen), but it's usually just a repeat at the end of the day of what his morning was like, only in reverse: get out of his lift chair and into scooter, ride to bed, get in bed. He fell in December 2007 down some steps. He hit his head so hard he had a hematoma (spelling? basically a blood clot between his skull and brain) and had to have brain surgery. He had 36 staples in his skull. He was able to walk with a walker for a while afterwards but then he broke his foot twice. He is a big man. I'm very small. I'm tall, but skinny and not muscular at all! I can't lift him up, much less watch my mom try. He falls frequently and we have to call someone, usually my nephew or brother-in-law to help. He has diabetes too. He also suffers greatly from depression. He has always been the outdoor type: outside by dawn, not inside before dusk. Now his situation has him just really down. I also suffer from chronic depression, and I know it stems (at least partly) from having to live here and care for them. It hurts to say (or type, rather) that, but it's true. I feel like I live in a nursing home. I have 3 college degrees and am certified to teach in 2 states, but have chosen to live here and keep them home. (I could work near here, deep in the Alabama "backwoods" but I've been unable thus far to find any openings.) I'm even having to see a therapist now and am on SIX meds, for anxiety, depression, chronic tachycardia, and a sleeping pill. (Oh, my dad also has chronic tachycardia, as well as asthma, COPD, and is prone to bouts of pneumonia very frequently. And just FYI, he is 70, my mom is 65.) But just today my mother fell over my dad's oxygen line, which prompted him to say that just last night he and my mom had discussed going to a nursing home. He looked like he'd been crying or something. His face was very red. He has acted odd lately: forgetful, irritable, etc. I can see that the nursing home is not going to be an alternative, the way it has been for several years now, but a requirement. Their health is at stake because it's getting dangerous for them to be here, and I'm always afraid to leave them alone. That, in turn, is making MY life hell. My therapist bluntly (and I'm glad for the honesty) said I'm in a no win situation. I'd be lost without my mom and dad, but it's getting to that point. I can't deny it any longer. I also can't deny what it's doing to me. And what hurts the MOST I think is that I am beginning ti feel resentment toward them, and I shouldn't. I wonder if that's normal. But anyway, I've said ALL THAT (and if you read it all, thank you and I'm sorry if I've bored you!!) to say that this home is all I have. An acre of land and a trailer. It's in pretty good shape though. I mean, the shell is pretty good, but there are a few things inside messed up, many where my dad ran into things on his scooter. In other words, regardless of its condition or market value, it's my home and all I have. I was just wondering if anyone knew if the nursing home or Medicaid or whoever would go after it. I've lived here for 14 years this June. The land has been in my name since about that time, but not the mobile home. I read something online that stated if I (well, a care-giving family member) lived IN THE HOME with the sick or elderly that they could not take it. I have proof that I've lived here since 2000. And as I said the actual land is mine and has been since well before the whole "5-year-'look-back'" period thing. I just feel like my situation is unique in this one way: lived in a trailer for 14 years that is NOT mine legally but is on land that IS legally mine. I also read something about "homesteading" laws or something... Basically if a "structure" is on one's land for a certain length of time with no rent being paid on it, it's the landowner's. Thank you all for listening, and truly thank you so much for your responses and empathy. It's hard being a caregiver. I applaud you all.
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You implied that the trailer had been there over 14 years. We just sold my MIL's trailer last month and the cost to move it, was $8,000. I was shocked. It turned out to be worth lots less, than she imagined. (We are in Tucson.)
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If the mobile home is more than 20 years old, it has no loan value and they won't go after it. They are only interested in marketable assets.
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Just because it is a mobile home doesn't mean that it is not worth much. Some of the mobile homes are quite nice and worth quite a lot. I imagine that they would want it to pay the fees.
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I can't imagine that the mobile home is worth enough, that even medicaid would be concerned about it. If she is already on Medicade, I don't think that you have a problem. Things do vary from state to state, though. I would just ask the nursing home.
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