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My 80 year old Mom has esophagial cancer, severe structure that doesn't allow her to eat much by mouth. She just got a feeding tube into her small intestine. Her original weight a year ago was 150lbs. She dropped to 136 in July 2014 (time when she was diagnosed with cancer and started having trouble eating). She is now about 121. She is being feed by tube and is currently getting about 1,200 calories by day. Heart rate elevated above 100 at times and blood pressure drops, suggesting dehydration. What would recommed should be her ideal caloric intake daily? She is currently mostly bed ridden since she says she has very little energy. Before she was diagnosed she would walk for miles up and down hills daily. She was independent, drove, did not have any health issues, was not on any medication, never drank, nor smoked. Any advice would be greatly welcomed.

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If the cancer is eradicated, I would avoid the surgery. Chemo and radiation are a really rough road. Hard on the heart and brain. I would want to see her fully stabilized first and foremost.
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Thank you for answer. My Mom appears to be stabilizing at 121-124lbs. I'm wondering what the ideal calorie count for a woman her age (80), with her condition (feeding tube, full esophagial structure), esophagectomy planned), cancer may have been eradicated by chemo & radiation (PET to confirm in two weeks). Thoughts?
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If she is intaking 1200 calories a day, but continuing to lose weight, ask why.
Is she losing muscle mass from inactivity? Or is she losing fat? Is she digesting what she takes in? Look at what comes out the other end. Is it only semi-digested? If so, things are starting to shut down, which should show up in bloodwork. Liver and kidney failure are identifiable via bloodwork and urinalysis. Pushing more calories into a failing system won't add anything.
Rising heart rate with dropping BP and O2 can also be signs of heart failure. You might want to get a Hospice evaluation at this point. They will talk to her privately and let her decide what she wants. Respect whatever decision she makes.
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