Now does my MOM have ALZ?

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I have reported here on my dad who is in advanced stages of ALZ and currently in a nursing home. But more and more signs my mom is losing it. We always passed these signs off as her general severe anxiety which prevents her from listening to anyone, or always asking the same question over and over for reassurance. And that indeed has been the case her whole life But her MD told me perhaps the anxiety is masking the memory issues. For about the third time in a month, she has forgot to hang up the phone, so now when we call to check up on her the line is busy all the time. Yesterday, she had to write a check to my brother and while she filled the numerals in correct, could not properly write the written portion stating the check amount. It took her eight tries. The SWs we have been working with for my dad have asked her if she has memory problems as she ask the same question over and over. I have explained this is the way she has always been. She is OCD, cannot take the time to listen to an answer to a question, and seems to ask it over and over when she does remember. e.g. She will ask me if my brothers car is blue, five times. (made up example). Finally I say it is green. She says, why did you say blue last time. So she did remember in that case. Nonetheless, worried I am entering second parent with ALZ. She has always been neurotic and therefore harder to deal with than my dad even while my dad has advanced stage ALZ. Her MD says she doesn't know how I do it. The MD says she is in a room for ten minutes with my mom and is worn out from the anxiety. She has always wanted to run a screening test for dementia, but is just happy to get out of the room after she has dealt with the issues my mom did come in for.

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Before you meet with experts for an evaluation, I might also stay with mom for a couple of days. Will she allow that? That way you can make a list of things that you observe. Sometimes, there are things that you don't observe just by visiting. I'd check dates on food in the fridge, unpaid bills status, laundry being done, and even chat with neighbors. Sometimes, they know stuff that is going on, but, don't know who to call.
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I think looking back on my Moms journey her slide began about 8 years ago with the inconsistent taking of her meds. She is probably about stage 5 -6 now. Yes the meds issue can have big implications. I used to load my Moms med container each week and during the last months of her living independently I would find days with the meds still in the daily slot. At that point I hired a “helper” (her cleaning lady who she already knew) to come in for an hour or so to sit with Mom and chat at night and get the meds taken. This eventually had to morph into 2x a day and more hours.

Your phone comment made me laugh! I had forgotten all the times Mom would forget to hang up her cell phone, and how many phones we went through since they would somehow end up in her water glass, or cordless phones would run out of battery and be found in her dresser. I finally bought her an old fashioned corded desk phone just like the old days! She could see to hang it up and it never went missing. $20 on eBay. Even had speed dial so she could just press a button to call me. That might get around your phone issue.
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Your mom not taking her meds is particularly telling that she should not be left alone
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Full workup sounds right to me, too. Could her PCP provide a referral to a geriatric psychiatrist?
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It's time for Mom to have a full neuro workup. She may have something wrong with her brain that is treatable???
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her MD has prescribed the anxiety meds but my mom does not take them regularly, so basically worthless
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I'm sorry to hear of your recent events. I know that I rely on the doctor, so if they are of little help, what's one to do...I'd be frustrated. I might let this doctor you are dewcribing check mom for things like UTI, vitamin deficiency, etc, and then ask for an expert in dementia, if all else is ruled out, to check her for that. Doctors who treat dementia patients, even those with anxiety, know how to handle them in a clinical setting. Does your mother take medication for anxiety? I might explore that with a doctor. 

Has she seen a neurologist or psychiatrist?
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