Anyone ever notice weird sleep patterns?

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Specifically, like actively moving limbs while dreaming or shaking all over during sleep? Sometimes my dad will moan in a very small voice as if he is trying to wake up from a nightmare. He dreams seemingly horrible dreams. But, if I wake him up, he doesn't seem upset by them at all. He has been shaking all over in his sleep recently. Upon waking--nothing out of the ordinary. Never seen anyone sleep the way he does, as he is so active in sleep & so hard to awaken. When he does wake up--he is so startled he jumps & looks terrified for a moment. The latter, he has always done when woken up. Weird, huh? blou

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Sooozi, same thing happened in my family. They didn't day "love you." Until a guy I was involved with "taught" me. Then I started telling everyone and like your family it spread. I didn't marry the guy, because in many ways he was a jerk, but that was one good thing he did. Maybe that is why he came into my life - just to teach me that.

When my mom was here visiting this summer. I reached over in the car one day and patted her arm, and she said, "You know since your dad died no one touches me. I really miss it." So we need to do more hugging too! Especially, when someone has lost their special loved one and is alone.
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My parents never told me they loved me and I can remember only one hug as a child growing up. I married a man who taught me to tell each other we love them. So, I decided as an adult, I would try to introduce that to my family.

At first they were pretty surprised when I told them I loved them, and I have to admit it was quite a few years before the culture of our family changed... so that others, besides just me were saying it. It was awkward, but eventually it happened and it lightened everything.

However, someone on this site reminded me to tell my mom that I love her and to hug her every day that I could, not matter how difficult that may be. I tried and I have to say that was the BEST advice I ever got. Now that both my parents are gone, I rest easy, knowing they knew ...

If it is to tell your parents you love them, or to say that you appreciate what they did for you as a child, even if it wasn't loving, but it was to feed you and keep you warm, I am forever thankful to the person who told me to show my appreciation while I could, because some day they will be gone.

My dad also told me that he talked to his mom every week (she lived in Switzerland) and one day, she was gone and he couldn't speak to her anymore and that was so final. I appreciate that I was warned about that and told to be thoughtful about what should be said and done with the people who will be leaving us one day.

I wish everyone on this site the best and know that it's a challenging journey for us all. My heart goes out to those who are working hard on this challenging path.
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to sooozi what a wonderful ending if thats how you want to put it. my family was never a huggy/kissy family but we love each other. i wish my dad could focus on more happy thoughts but for him, he focuses on the negative of things that happen, so it is what it is with him. I am sure when his time comes he will be at more peace and be happy to be with the Lord.
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My dad had something they called something like eschemic strokes. They were very little strokes that would occur at night. My mom would try to wake him up in the morning and he would not wake easily... and he never remembered the difficulty she had waking him.

A few times, in the beginning we called 911 and he was brought to the hospital for a check up. He was always fine later and as a matter of fact, as my dad aged, he became nicer, kinder, smiled more easily. Finally after a few trips to the hospital, he instructed us not to call 911. Each time it happened, he eventually woke up and never remembered any problem.

He lived this way for many years. During his last evening, he told me to notice how well everything turned out and he was very happy and content. It was his 57th wedding anniversary and he was surrounded by his loving family. The next morning, he didn't wake up at all.

I just want to assure you that this process occurred over many years and my dad was comfortable, happy and had all his wits about him the whole time.

Just be sure to tell your Dad that you love him every day and hug him when ever you can.
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I agree with the post made by "ProfeChari" and "tooyoung". Some medications have been known to cause side effects such as bad dreams, suicidal tendencies, depression, etc. If your father is taking a combination of on medications, the combination could be causing side effects ( you can research this on the internet). Sometimes a combination of medication and herbal teas can cause issues. I wish you the best in finding a solution.
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sounds like sleep walking also...my daughter did that for many years, even opened door and yelled outside, carried on another conversation with my older daughter (and it scared her), so I said we will deal with it tomorrow and lead her back to bed. she never remembered anything. I guess it could be a number of things. its amazing what our minds can make our bodies do.
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While we were sleeping my husband kicked my leg. I said "You kicked me!" He said "I"m sorry". Then he sat up in bed and said "I did not do it!" I turned on light and he looked wild and grabbed a small music box and saw the dog asleep and said "He did it" and threw the music box. The dog ran to hide and my husband got a chair and tried to hit her. I took her to another bedroom. Then he went to front door and said he was leaving and wanted me to get him some clothes. He went to kitchen and I suggested a bowl of cereal and he said no but ate a muffin.

Finally about 2 a.m. we went to bed. The next day he did not remember anything and slept most of day.
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My husband had the REM sleep disorder a many years before the dementia symptoms got bad enough to get diagnosed. It retrospect, it was probably the first symptoms. One theory is that the constant lack of quality sleep is one of the causes of the dementia. So, I've had doctors say it is important to treat sleep disorders as soon as possible. If only we had known.

Back to my husband, who has has Lewy Body Dementia. His sleeping activity was so violent I'd kicked and punched, because he is often fighting off people attacking him (BTW - he always wanted to be a cop). It wasn't always violent. Sometimes he would just start laughing and laughing. When I threatened to sleep in a different bed, he started sleeping with his back to me. This help some. Once he got diagnosed, after 7 years and 5 doctors, his neurologist prescribed Gabapentin, which is used for seizures. It works like a charm. I guess it relaxes his muscles. He still has the dreams, but his movements are more subdued. I haven't been punched in years.

Bloujeanbaby, since your profile says your father has Alzheimer/dementia and this is a symptom of LBD it is important that you get the correct diagnosis. So definitely discuss it with his doctor. Some meds that work for LBD don't for Alz and viceversa. LBD also has some Parkinson-like symptoms and some meds that work for that don't work for LBD and yet those LBD gets diagnosed as Parkinsons. It's important to get a doctor who knows the difference and many don't.
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My dad is 90 and has been doing this for 4 or 5 years when he naps during the day. But he is not having nightmares, just dreams. He does sing in his sleep, flails his arms around, shakes his legs (restless leg syndrome), and is very hard to wake up. Many times when we have to wake him up, he will be in another "time", like looking for his brothers who have been dead for many years, or unable to focus on his surroundings for a few minutes. He doesn't have any of the symptoms for LBD though. Since this has not caused any issues with his life, we just help him come back to reality once he wakes up enough.
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Our doctor warned us about this, that it is a symptom of my husband's LBD and that there are meds to help. Please talk to his doctor.
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