Why am I not feeling stronger from yoga or weight lifting?

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I am a 76 year old male and have been weight lifting for over 50 years and doing yoga for about one. I don't seem to be building strength like before and feel weak much of the time. I have been tested for heart, blood, pulmonary, testosterone, and cortisol and all results have come back normal. Is this just an age problem or something else?

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P.S. The video I saw of him is on a site called growing bolder. I guess he also has videos he sells, but I'm just talking about the free video of him I saw on growing bolder. He's an amazing guy!
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For the best thing I've ever seen (and most inspirational) Google Stephen Jepson and NeverLeaveThePlayground. He's a 70+ something guy who does amazing FUN types of exercise. I'm totally going to start doing some of the things he recommends.

And contrary to popular belief, you can still build new muscle even after 90! Here's the results of a recent study: After doing specific training for 12 weeks, people over the age of 90 improved their strength, power and muscle mass. This was reflected in an increase in their walking speed, a greater capacity to get out of their chairs, an improvement in their balance, a significant reduction in the incidence of falls and a significant improvement in muscle power and mass in the lower limbs. These are some of the outcomes of the study recently published in the journal Age of the American Ageing Association and which was led by Mikel Izquierdo-Red-n, Professor of Physiotherapy at the NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre.

24 people between 91 and 96 participated in the research, eleven of them in the experimental group and 13 in the control group. Two days a week over a 12-week period they did multicomponent training: a programme of various exercises designed specifically for them and which combined strength training and balance improving exercises. As Mikel Izquierdo explained, "the training raised their functional capacity, lowered the risk of falls, and improved muscle power. In addition to the significant increases in the physical capacity of frail elderly people, the study has shown that power training can be perfectly applied to the elderly with frailty."

With ageing, the functional capacity of the neuromuscular, cardiovascular and respiratory system progressively starts to diminish, and this leads to an increased risk of frailty. Physical inactivity is one of the fundamental factors that contributes to the loss of muscular mass and functional capacity, a key aspect in frailty.

"From a practical point of view," says Prof Izquierdo, "the results of the study point to the importance of implementing exercise programmes in patients of this type, exercises to develop muscle power, balance and walking." In his view, "it would be beneficial to apply exercises of this type among vulnerable elderly people to prevent the impact of ageing, improve their wellbeing and help them to adapt to the society in which they live."

The piece of research which has been echoed by the American Ageing Association is entitled: "Multicomponent exercices including muscle power training enhance muscle mass, power output and functional outcomes in instituzionalized frail nonagenarians".
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A twelve- year old boy can lift weights all day and won't build muscle mass, because his body is not programmed for that. The same thing happens in old age, mother nature doesn't program you to build heavy muscles or bones at that point in your life. She usually knows what is best for the body as a whole.
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Maybe you need to rethink your diet, you have a great history of activity, maybe you need to cut out meat or alcohol, your body is looking for something else.
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Something we all have to accept as we get older is our bodies are just not going to work as good as before. Really, the best we can shoot for is to be as good as possible for our age. We can do things like cosmetic surgery or steroid injection. It may fool observers, but our bodies aren't fooled. Our cells know how old they are.
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