Why would a State (North Carolina) not allow rails on the residents beds in assisted living? - AgingCare.com

Why would a State (North Carolina) not allow rails on the residents beds in assisted living?

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One of the residents at my mothers facility has stitches in her leg due to falling out of bed (she falls out a lot) I'm told that the state of North Carolina will not allow rails on any of the beds . How do you take a senior a large senior at that, and expect them to say in a single bed? My mother will only sleep in a chair and I don't have to worry about this now but I know soon she will have no choice (her knees are locking up and she has no cartilage between the bones she will be bed ridden) In most of the semiprivate room one of the beds has to be placed against an A/C heater unit this leaves the perfect cubby hole to get wedged in. Maybe I'm not thinking straight but I don't see the logic.

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I understand that bed railings cause more risk of injury than not having them up. My elderly friend also tried to get up to go to the bathroom and fell and broke her arm.
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My FIL fell out of his bed in the nursing home many times. With his dementia, he would wake up and want to use the bathroom and would attempt to get out of bed- totally forgetting he didn't have any legs.

After it happened several times, they lowered his bed closer to the floor. Close enough to lessen the risk of a serious head injury and high enough that the aides could still transfer him to his geri- chair (sp?).
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I think there have been injuries involving bed railings. Some residents will try to climb over them, presenting greater risk of falling.
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When my mother-in-law fell and broke her OTHER hip, while she was in the hospital, they weren't allowed to put up the railings unless they were transporting her. Then in the nursing home for rehab, they weren't allowed to 'fence' her in there either. It's some sort of rule that they had to enforce, because it was considered ' holding someone against their will' or some other wording to that effect.
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