Is newer technology making it more difficult for Seniors? - AgingCare.com

Is newer technology making it more difficult for Seniors?

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I just had an aha moment as to why my parents refuse to get cable TV... the remotes are too complicated. Even I get baffled and I am usually good at figuring things out. Back when my Dad worked at GE he designed one of the first remotes.. it was so simple.... TV on or off... volume up or down.... change channels [of course back then we had a grand total of 3 to 4 channels]. Now look at today's remotes.

Last year Mom got a new washing machine... whatever happened to just ON/OFF,Hot, Cold, Heavy Load, Light Load, Delicate... and that was it. This machine was so complicated even Dad, who is an engineer, wasn't sure how to do a simple load of wash... plus the letter on the machine was in light blue which looked pretty but it was tough for aging eyes to read.

When we get into our 90's, I wonder what technology will be like then... will we need to sit in the dark because we can't figure out how to turn on the lights in the living room using our telephone???

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Gonzalez38, you are not alone, I really dislike cellphones maybe because I was so use to the clear sound from a landline, not the dropped sounds and loud back ground noise from the cellphone. And I noticed just about everyone who has a cellphone TALKS VERY LOUD. In my home, the previous owner has 15 telephone jacks.... so there are land-line telephones everywhere... no running, tripping over the cat, or stubbing a toe to find that ringing cellphone that dropped into the trash can :0 Plus I need to stock up on those long 25 foot handset cords as they are getting harder to find.

Sounds like in your household a mix of simple old fashioned technology along with some modern technology is working. Your'wife is one step ahead of me, I can't use a laptop.... the keyboard is too awkward, I need a regular keyboard and Mouse.
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It is dificult. And is more if you add age and mental confusion. Many years ago we passed from wall phones to wireless, they worked fine for years, and my wife evolved to cell. I never did because for some strange reason I disliked even if I used a lot of computers and technology. I just did not like them.
Things changed when my wife began with Alz. we had being changhing m any things. As she has being evolving she just copuld not use the cell, nor the credit cards, just coud not remember the code and after some times going to the bank , I just "forgot" to give her one. The cell phones were another problem, she misplaced every where and we never find it, my solution was to re-install the wall type with nothing different, just the basic, and is working fine, I installed lines, simple lines and sockets where we use to have the cell ones and bought simple wall phones. Solved. Sam e with the washing machine, we bought a new one without any modernities. Simple. I am doing the same with everything, radio, tv, microwave, etc. for computing, she is using an old HP laptop for simple games like the basic Mahjong, and is happy. On tue other hand I discovered with the smartphones thast they are closer to the computers, and that I can have an app with a GPS that allows me to monitor her outside. A grand relieve!! So, I am having to learn to use a Galaxy. Thats is life!!!
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Freflyer I can manage a power outage just as well as your parents BUT I have the luxury of an automatic generator so I don't have to. Can't use the stove but can plug in a hot plate and toaster oven plus the microwave etc.
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Nicholas29, even a simple power outage can cause a family to go into a melt down. Especially if one hasn't recharged their cellphone and any of the other devices that need to be recharged.

It's funny, I find the power outage more difficult to deal with then my parents [90's].... they just go on like nothing happened. Dad gets out the battery operated lanterns, Mom prepares lunch/dinner using items that don't need cooking, etc. It's like they are back in the 1920's :)
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Nicholas it really concerns me that in the case of an EMP the skills needed for a more basic technology, and indeed, way of life will have been lost.
Today's young adults do not know how to make simple repairs, their solution is to pick up their I phone and call a repair person. This also includes my own three children now in their forties who were raised in a home where these skills were practiced daily. Technology is very important in our lives and as a senior I appreciate the fantastic advances in medical technology in particular, but I also appreciate the ability I have to mend a hole in my socks.
Many of those over 50 and/or cognitively impaired can navigate the new world technology if it is properly presented. The real problem is that instructions with new products are frequently poorly translated from far away countries in print so small an ant would need a magnifying glass.
Another problem recently encountered was an elevator and I still don't know what the letters actually mean. I know to press T if I want the lobby and that T1 and T2 are the two basement levels.
Apart from acrynoms there is a whole new language out there. We no longer have garbage men they are now sanitation engineers (without an increase in pay) Try finding X-ray in the hospital. It is now "Imaging" may seniors are perfectly capable of learning new technologies but many don't want to have to waste time on that. There are far more fulfilling ways of spending our time. Smelling the roses and watching the sunset come to mind.
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Technology is certainly helping our lives in medicine and business but it is a real shame what it is causing to the personal lives of many of us over age 50. Someday technology will be brought to its knees when an EMP may occur from one of a number of sources. Then we'll have to return to more basic technology.
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Veronica91, found it some years ago on-line. It's been quite helpful :) Go to Google and type in "acronym finder".
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Wow fregflyer there is an acronyms dictionary?
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bookluvr, same here regarding the cellphone [or *sellphone* as the companies are always trying to get us to upgrade]. I have to laugh, if someone told us 20 years ago we would be typing with our thumbs, I would think they were out of their minds. I use my cell only for emergencies.... I do have the pull out keyboard for texting but I get too flustered trying to type and I give up and call the person instead. One advantage of texting, those who feel the need to talk LOUD on the cellphone now do texting, so the environment is a tad quieter :)

I don't have a Face Book account. If something very important is going on in someone's life, they can call me and tell me about it, and vise versa. My significant other has repeatedly told his grown daughter to stop posting photos of her young daughters on Face Book... you never know who will lift off a copy and use it elsewhere. Does she listen? No.

Veronica91, the abbreviation texting that the younger people use reminds me of short hand class in high school :) Where I work, we have been looking for new employees, and we will get e-mail cover sheets in text language.... if we find ourselves spending too much time using an acronyms dictionary, that resume goes to the bottom of the pile.
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I am right with you Book. I do have a cell phone but rarely use it and seldom give out the number. I will probably upgrade to one with a camera but that is because the one I am looking at has an emergency panic button and they can locate you with GPS. no extra cost for the one endorced by the over 55s company whoose name I can't mention. I do like my laptop though
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