I'm new at learning to be a caregiver for my aging Mom. Any advice?

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Any support groups in my area; 46205? I am 53, she is 79.
She is having typical aging issues.

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take care of yourself. Find ways to spend time away from the house. I have long weekends and they are "very long" but don't feel like "weekends." Good luck and let us know how you are doing. xo
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People here in agingcare are very accommodating and warm, so if you encounter any issues that you find difficult to handle, do not hesitate to ask question and you will find helpful answers. Caregiving is a very stressful task, which can drain you physically, emotionally and mentally. A lot of caregivers in long term care facilities and even family caregivers providing care to loved ones who are dependent on long term care services also experience stress and even depression. There are also a lot of senior caregiver support group, I have a list of caregiver support group that you can check, I have included their website and contact details in case you want to give them a call so you can raise your concerns:

http://www.infolongtermcare.org/senior-caregiver-support/elderly-caregiver-support-organization/
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I'm new at being a caregiver to my mom too....which in my case is long distance as we live about 350 miles apart. My sister passed away unexpectedly a few months ago...so I had to fall into line quickly and try to pick up where she had things lined up. My mom is 83, still lives in her own her home - has some health problems but nothing too major yet. She does suffer from arthritis and some memory problems and uses a walker full-time now. Some advice I have and I've also fine-tuned some things after my sister passed to make things better for my mom: She has a wonderful home health agency that comes to her home at least once and sometimes more than once a day (for companion and light exercises when she feels like exercising); they monitor her medications, make her a meal, and most importantly ensure she is taking her pills; also help with errands and housecleaning and doctor appointments. She has a medical alert pendent. I have also widened both her bathroom doors so that her walker now can go freely throughout the house. She has a lady from her church that comes to visit weekly. And I also now have her receiving a hot meal once a day (M-F) through "meals on wheels". Me and my family (hubby and two young boys) go and visit about once a month but I check in with her caregivers often and call my mom daily. I also schedule her doctor appointments when i am there so I can accompany her. I've also had "the talk" with my mom as to what she would like to do -- when she can no longer stay safely in her home -- and she said she would go into assisted living as we all kind of agree it would be tough -- all of us living together under one roof since I have two small (very active) boys. When she was staying with us after my sister's funeral and over the holidays...we went and checked out an assisted living place very close to us that my co-worker recommended that her mother is in...and both me and my mom loved it and decided that was where she will go when the time comes. Fortunately, my mom has the funds to support assisted living and also qualifies for VA benefits. I think having your parent part of the decision making process of what place they may live one day is really important if the circumstances allow for it.

This new role for me has been very challenging and I have been feeling lots of anxiety in this transition - which I think may be the fact that I'm still grieving over my sister's death...it feels really scary to be the "only child" in making sure your parent is safe and happy. But you can really only do your best and also live your own life and make each day count....I keep thinking I have to do this and get it together as I have two small children still to raise!
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Read the little book "Talking To Alzheimer's" secretly in your spare time. For me, it set the tone for our interactions. I tend to be one of those people who need to "get it right" all the time; this sort of situation never lets you win. Get in the habit of eating well and taking 40 min. daily for exercise, even if it's pushups and situps in your living room. Martyrs don't seem to score big in this event, fill your chest with love and know that it isn't forever.
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Stay on this site and visit it often w/questions and experiences. You will find this is the greatest support group you can find. It has helped me tremendously understand what I had been going through with my still fisty w/dementia MIL. Today I am much stronger in coping with the aging process -- both her's and mine.
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I would suggest to get educated and seek out help early and often. Don't wait until you're nearly burnt out to reach out and get some assistance. There's lots of help if you're open to it so you don't have to go it alone and feel isolated through it all.
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I was raised by a nun, friend of my mother who has cancer when I was just 4. I chose to be a caregiver to thank back for raising me. Now that I lived on my own, I keep on helping lots of families by my profession. At first, it's really a tough one. and you should prepare your self and widen your patience.
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Il, i meant to say take care of youself first. I have been learning to do that, and keep a sdnse of humor. My mom is 90,she thinks she can do anything.
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I too am new to this too. Thank you Lep, my sister said ihad to be there 24/7. She lives in California. My sonlives with me and helps me alot with my mom,he also has health problems. I have been looking into someone coming in once in awhile to help her.Her memory is still good. She argues with me all the time.5
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My advice is to not do it. I'm sorry to be so negative but carry for my mom for the last year and a half has been a nightmare.
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