Would it be considered neglect if my sibling lives with our elder parent and does the bare minimum providing care?

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I give the custodial sibling the benefit of the doubt. CM pointed out a good example. If you do see gaps in the care, such as entertainment, treats, specific diet, perhaps you can suggest to your sister how you can fill them.
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My SIL isn't very happy with my mother's quality of care, either. She thinks my mother should be up at seven, dressed by eight and hard at her PT by nine every morning. I get my mother up when she feels like it, and only ask her three times if she wants to get dressed on any given day. It's a difference of opinion.

But my mother hasn't had cancer.

Are you not on speaking terms with the resident sibling? How would you say your father is, in terms of how comfortable and well-supported does he feel?

For practical matters, the advice above is all good. To stop worrying unnecessarily, I think you'd be best taking it up with your father and your sibling, preferably both together. Take them round a cake or something.
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Depending on the type of insurance your father has, he may qualify for a medication dispensing machine. A nurse fills it once a week or so, and it dispenses medication and alerts the patient at medication time. Very useful.

As far as "the bare minimum", that is sort of vague. I would assume that means something like he gets food, although not always nutritious or on a reliable schedule. He is mostly clean, and his home is mostly clean, but may smell bad at times but is nothing that would be considered a health risk. That sort of thing. If that is the case, I don't think there is a lot you can do. If your father is unhappy with the care being provided, I'm sure you could work with him to change the arrangement. If he doesn't mind the way things are going, then maybe it's best to just let them do things their way.
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Your concerns about medications are very valid. Can you call his MD and ask for a visiting nurse once a week? Our VNA was able to get MIL to take her meds on schedule.
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pstegman, he does have all the basics you mentioned and not in pain or dirty. So i guess he is not neglected by that definition.
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You can call APS and have them check on him!
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When dad was with me he needed 24/7 care , it's a great blessing that surgery helped remove the cancer, and is cancer free, now it's slow and steady healing with alot of changes and maintenance medications, I see that there is no consistency of when they are taken and breakfast can be at 9 am one day 1pm the next. When he first went home he had a routine, seemed motivated and active now things are so off balance now.
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If you feel your parent is being neglected can you take over their care or get someone else to come in?
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If the patient has food, water, shelter there may not be neglect. What do you mean by bare minimum? Is the patient dirty, hungry, filthy or in pain?
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Ah yes, my parent was living with me over the summer and fall, once thier last surgery and rehab was complete wanted to go home, at that point my sibling moved in.
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