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My nephews Special Needs Account is set up with no interest.

Like a SNT is a MT not Irrevokable. As such, there is no reason to over draw it? The overage goes into it and if like a SNT there are stipulations on how the Trust can be used. Because in the end, the Trust reverts back to Medicaid.

Just trying to figure this out.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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Have you tried a credit union? Another bank? Unfortunately banks do turn you down if you have bad credit, or a history of overdrafts or you have an unpaid debt to a bank. Essentially you can be blacklisted by a bank! I don’t know if it would work for a miller trust but you can get her an online bank account but again, that may not work for a miller trust.
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Reply to worriedinCali
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Bunbun, it could simply be a rule and they can't make exceptions for one because it opens them up to litigation.

I would also think that they are concerned about creditors placing liens against the account that costs them, they are required to deal with every request and the man power is expensive.
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Reply to Isthisrealyreal
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I would like to elaborate on my earlier post. Please forgive me.
But, it may help someone. And, it may be relevant to the OP.

When my mother went into the nursing home, she was flat broke; maybe $1200 in a checking account.

But, before the nursing home, after establishing the legal document and the bank account for the Miller Trust (QIT), and her being eligible for at home/community Medicaid, she had no "income" other than social security and VA benefits. To pay her bills, I had to move funds from her IRA to the QIT, because the IRA withdrawals were "income" and then pay the caregiving agency and medical expenses from the QIT.

Hope that made sense. If not, and you want more info, let me know.
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Reply to Daughter1954
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Segoline May 6, 2019
It made absolute sense to me.

And qit is qualified income trust. Same as Miller. Just is some states has diff name.
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You should prob talk with a locally owned bank, based in your state. Some of the larger ones with branches everywhere, are just impossible to deal with.
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Reply to Segoline
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Yes, this doesn’t make sense. Money goes into the trust, there is no borrowing against it, so no credit issues. Banks very rarely refuse to take money! Perhaps there is already an overdraft, for sister or for which sister is a guarantor, and the bank wants that paid off first. Ask more questions from more people, in banks or social services or Medicaid.
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Reply to MargaretMcKen
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worriedinCali May 6, 2019
Actually it does make sense to be denied a bank account due to bad credit. In the US you can be blacklisted from banks/denied a bank account if you had bad credit, an outstanding debt with a bank or a history of overdrafts. It’s quite common here.
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A Miller Trust is for people going on Medicaid for LTC that monthly income is higher than the Medicaid cap. Ex: cap is 2k and u bring in 2200. The 2oo goes into the trust reverting back to Medicaid at your passing. Has nothing to do with credit.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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Daughter1954 May 6, 2019
Yes, all true. And, at least in Florida, the bank account must be non-interest bearing. So, forget places like Fidelity because they have no types of accounts that don't pay some level of interest.

You can establish the legal document and the bank account even if your sister is at home receiving "at home" Medicaid, and, until your sister goes into a nursing home, you can use the funds in the bank account for medical expenses --- just make sue that the legal document establishing the trust allows for that. Keep very detailed records. For my mother, when she was still at home and on at home/community Medicaid, and still using credit cards (because she was not broke yet, and her assets were exempt for Medicaid purposes), I looked at every charge and paid the credit card with separate checks, using the trust for whatever medical expenses were charged. If there was money in the trust.

Does your sister already have a credit card with this bank, one that she does not pay off in full every month? Or some other loan? If not, I don't understand why your sister's credit has anything to do with opening a bank account. Just tell them you do not want a credit card, or overdraft protection. Just a simple non-interest bearing checking account, and an ATM/Debit card.

In Florida, DCF has a one-page "rules" sheet about this kind of trust. Maybe your state does too.

If that doesn't work, ask around about credit unions.
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https://www.dhss.delaware.gov/dhss/dsaapd/faq_miller_trust.html


I'm not sure you can set up a Miller Trust without using an attorney.
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Reply to BarbBrooklyn
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Ahmijoy May 6, 2019
I think it depends on who you talk to, Barb. When we were considering a Miller Trust (a.k.a. Qualified Income Trust”) my own bank told me I’d need an attorney. However, the caseworker at the Medicaid office here told me which bank to go to. She said this bank is experienced in setting up QIT. When I called this bank (Huntington) she said I didn’t need an attorney. All I had to do was fill out the forms sent to me by Medicaid and bring them in, then open a checking account to be used for the funds.
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