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I am needing to find a Care Navigator/Advocate for my aunt in the Kansas City, Missouri area. Does anyone know someone who is kind and reliable doing this kind of work in KCMO? Or have suggestions how to find someone like this?


It seems that most of the people who call themselves these titles and things like it are actually affiliated with care agencies also providing in-home skilled and unskilled assistance, it seems to defeat the purpose of an independent advocate being employed by the same organization that is providing the day to day care. We feel part of the navigator/advocate's role would be to monitor her treatment and care by these services. Help!


Thank you!

Hello, I read what you wrote. I just delt with this couple weeks ago. You can accomplish this by doing these steps:
1. Contact " Palliative Care " Dr. in your aunt's health network.
2. Schedule appointment with Palliative Care.
3. In the appointment ask the Palliative Care nurse if they will follow your aunt's care that she is receiving at home.
4. Palliative care will then want to see your aunt every 3 months or so, but they will oversee your aunts care at home.
Also, you can call the local hospital that your aunt goes to when needed, call that hospital ask to speak with a social worker, then ask the social worker if she knows of an " aging and in home services " agency. The " Aging and In Home Services do act as an advocate independent of the in-home service day to day care of your aunt.
Let me know how it works out, and I hope this helps.
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Reply to Caregivingguy
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Did you try the Next Door Neighbor app? The other thing is any local area on aging will be able to advise you at least somewhat.
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LosingItToday: Many internet sites can be googled. Advertising as such is not permitted here.
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Reply to Llamalover47
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I'm having the same problem here in Hawaii, although, I'm looking for an independent caregiver right now and not a Care Navigator/Advocate. I did sign up with Caresift and they only work with agencies and their feedback is based on the clients who use the agencies they recommend which sort of defeats the purpose of having a care navigator.
Even the websites who have local independent caregivers listed, want a monthly fee before they will release any information on those looking for caregiver employment. And when I read the fine print, the website says it is up the person seeking the help to vet the caregiver and do a background check. It makes me wonder what the monthly fee is for.
My next option will be going on a community website like Nextdoor and hope to find someone who has used a caregiver that they can recommend. I'm also putting the word out to my friends who may know someone. It seems it is coming down to networking.
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Reply to Tutu82Kailua
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ConnieCaretaker Oct 28, 2022
https://humanservices.hawaii.gov/ssd/files/2013/01/DHS-1610-6-15.pdf

Call and ask for assistance or a referral to vetted providers.
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Perhaps call Adult Protective Services for a recommendation and make a Zoom meeting with you and the Elder Care Attorney in her area: if she is cognizant, include her.

Missouri Ombudsman: https://health.mo.gov/seniors/ombudsman/program.php
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Reply to ConnieCaretaker
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I think the site to find board certified medical advocates in your area is NAHAC.COM
or you can try a Life Care associate at aginglifecare.org.
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Reply to MACinCT
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I noticed they are quie expensive if not affiliated with a placement agency. Ask at her local church also.
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Reply to KathleenQ
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I googled “geriatric care manager” and found a great advocate. Unfortunately she is based in Philadelphia. generationcrossroads.com. But perhaps a Google search will also work for you. Best wishes!
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Reply to EstherBernard
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It sounds like your aunt is in another area from where you are located.
Or perhaps, not..
Either way, one needs to begin this type of conversation with your aunt's PCP, primary care physician for appropriate referrals in the area where she lives and based on the PCP assessment of her abilities and needs.

Also, consider speaking with an Elder Care Attorney who can provide directions also.

You also need to be sure that you have the POA authority if needed assigned by your aunt to you to speak and act on her behalf. If your aunt is alert/oriented and able to make her wishes known, this is a good time to get that , or assigned to someone else; also be aware that if your aunt is able to speak for herself then her wishes and decisions will take precedent.

It is admirable for you to help your aunt; there are many , many pitfalls and considerations to be aware of on this journey. Educating oneself via a PCP and Elder Care Attorney will be vital and perhaps help off set some of those pitfalls.

Practice good self care also......

Peace.
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Reply to janicemeyer18
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The most objective and helpful one I found was recommended by our family doctor, who said he wouldn't hesitate to use him with his family. That being said, most seemed interested in immediately putting you in a place and collecting the very nice bonus from them. Many do work for that bonus primarily, but that doesn't make them necessarily misleading. But the faster they can place your person, the sooner they go onto the next one. One worked by the hour but wasn't very helpful. Marketing people make most of the money in this industry, aside from owners. Notice I now refer to it as an industry. Now, riding high as baby boomers age. However, I have noticed not so high as the real estate market turns around. People who act as guardians, i.e. estate lawyers, visit these places often for clients or review care. You might see if some elder care or estate lawyers can give you some guidance. Or if your lawyer could find out, or your aunt's...I had a friend, who was one, and sure knew. Clergy men often visit such places. Know any, or anyone who does? Interestingly, firemen can assess places, if they will tell you. They are there as EMTs frequently, know how well they function in emergencies, how clean, how staffed, etc. Know any hospital employees? People in the ER will have definite ideas of such places. I found another nice lady from a grocery clerk familiar with new immigrants in her community. Word of mouth!!! Dig up some ratings to start with. Medicare and some other agencies rate places, up, down? Eliminate the ones that have been seriously downgraded. (They will all have a few glitches, just like us.) There are modestly useful google reviews at times. Then if geography is useful; it is really the most practical place to begin. They will deluge you with marketing, I assure you, if you contact them. Days, type of assistance needed, financial ability. Ask them exactly about this, take any raves about food, socializing, caring staff, with a big grain of salt. What else would they say? I still recommend asking anyone, grocery clerks, church contacts, people chatting in office, doctor's office employees, if they have suggestions. Any clergy helping immigrants, you can find some highly skilled people who are starting over here. Again, we were lucky with a beautiful Ethiopian accountant, working as a health aide for an agency. Having done so on several occasions, I would be hesitant to get home care unless someone who was very clear mentally was around to supervise or receiving it. And start clearly on a trial basis. That being said, it is wonderful when it is wonderful Pay them well and treat them sweetly if you find a good person.

This is a problem that is increasingly common in our society. Word of mouth!!! Ronald Reagan had good advice, "Trust but verify". It is a big industry, with lots of money at stake. Be prepared, when things happen, it can happen suddenly. Good luck, like most big decisions it is mixed bag and one has to weigh the pros and cons. But it is an industry, and at times, reminds me of car dealerships. Have an estate lawyer review any contracts you sign, and ask them again about other suggestions, before signing! I should add, many will rush you, saying this apartment is going fast, grab it now.
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Reply to Moxies
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My family worked with an elder care coordinator at a Life Care Planning Law Firm. The elder care coordinator wasn’t trying to sell anything. 100% advocate for our elderly mom. Best money we spent. LCPLFA.org to find one in your area.
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Advertising reported to admin
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Reply to Becky04469
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google eldercare managers or geriatric care managers in your area.
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Reply to Worriedspouse
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Try calling “A Place for Mom” they have access to many in home independent living situations/services and assisted living resources. They point you in the right direction. The service is free and they are very pleasant and caring. They will be able to answer all of your questions and can also find emergency placement in retirement and senior living apartments, in home and inpatient, respite, rehab, inpatient/home hospice, social worker services that cover everything from living accommodations to advice on how to apply for Medicare, Medicaid and many other family services. They are excellent at follow up and checking in with you and even reminding you of future services to fit every need. Be it for male or female, ages 55 and up, anywhere in the country. Local or long distance services, disabled or memory care services, location of hospitals and pet services and much much more! I hope this information is helpful! Good luck and best wishes!
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Reply to Rainbow2121
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Check here.... https://www.agingcare.com/local/geriatric-care-managers

I just looked for one we worked with several years ago and she is listed there and was totally independent and took no kickbacks from agencies she referred to... but that also means you pay for her services.

Here is some good info... https://www.medicalalertbuyersguide.org/articles/what-happened-to-caremanager-org/

I am sure some do work with specific agencies so any one you contact ask if they are independent. The one we worked with helped give us direction in making future plans but I also know of one client who had no advocate that she helped be sure decisions were being made in his best interest.
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I would research a CELA firm. They have fiduciaries on staff that can act as an advocate.
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kathleenkbuddy Oct 28, 2022
What is CELA?
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I did a little googling and you are right, the geriatric care managers I found do all seem to be associated with home care agencies. Have you contacted your mother's area agency on aging to have her evaluated and get their advice?
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LosingItToday Oct 22, 2022
We have talked to them a few months ago. They have no personnel to help, and haven't for some time. They can't get people to come do the work and fill the positions they need filled to support the aging community. It's very disheartening. Thanks for your response and your effort trying to help!
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