We need someone to come to my Mothers apartment to do a new POA. - AgingCare.com

We need someone to come to my Mothers apartment to do a new POA.

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My mother lives in an apartment complex for seniors and we were told by the office that her POA is outdated as there are new ones available. We need someone who will come to her apartment with the standard POA and my sister and I will meet them there. My mother has all of her faculties and is able to sign a POA.

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reikiyou2, if at all possible it would be better and less costly if your Mother was able to go to the Attorney's office.

Otherwise the Attorney would charge for his/her time traveling from the office to the apartment and back again... and charge for his/her Notary time/travel, plus your Mom would need two witnesses [neither you nor your sister can witness if your Mom had chosen both of you to be her Power of Attorney], the notary cannot be a signed witness, thus the Attorney would need to bring two of his/her Staff to come along as Witnesses unless Mom or you can produce two witnesses.

Plus if there is any last minute change to the Power of Attorney, it is easier to do in the office.

It is always good to have a Power of Attorney updated, but it is never mandatory. In fact, I don't recall giving the complex where my Dad lived a copy of the POA, only the DNA paperwork, and a form that was filled out asking about doctor, dentist, etc. and who was my Dad's POA.
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Contact Legal Services for the Elderly in your county. They can help.
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The law firm that handled my father's estate plan publishes an e-letter monthly, with updates on statutory changes, practical issues, and more. If a newly enacted statute affects estate planning, not only would it likely be addressed in the e-letter, but the firm also may send out letters to clients suggesting that their estate plans be reviewed b/c of these legal changes.
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I don't think the people at the office have a clue, as far as I know there is no legal requirement to change a POA regardless of how old it may be (although it might be advisable to review it as time brings life changes), if it was properly drawn up, signed and witnessed it is still in force. You might want to confirm this by consulting with the law office where the original was executed.
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This is a forum for Q & A and support; it doesn't provide legal services beyond advice. You need to find an attorney and discuss not only what your mother needs but whether or not she can go to the attorney's office for a meeting, discussion and to sign a new POA, ONLY IF the attorney feels it necessary.

I would not base ANY legal action on the recommendation of someone in an apartment management office. I doubt if they're qualified to make legal decisions on delegation of authority.
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