I need a Limited POA that does not include financial for a caregiver. Can you help me find one? - AgingCare.com

I need a Limited POA that does not include financial for a caregiver. Can you help me find one?

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My Mom can no longer do for herself and my step-dad is 94 and uses a walker. He is trying to take care of her but realizes that he no longer can and wants to find a place for her. They can not afford to pay that kind of money and I need to get her on Medicaid so she can go to a secure place. She has either lost or thrown away all of her identification. Neither of them drive and I can only go see them every other week to help. They live 70 miles away from me and I have to work. I need to find a way to get her some ID and sign her up for Medicaid. Their monthly income is approximately $3000.00 a month. If you could find me a site where I could copy a Limited POA for a caregiver that doesn't include financial it would be a big help. I have her Designation of Health Care Surrogate form already but I know for a POA it has to be Notarized and for that she needs ID. Please find a way to help us, my Dad can't take much more. He has trouble getting her to eat and she takes things and hides them or maybe throws them away. She is constantly leaving the house saying she has to get home and then can't find her way back to the house. The police have brought her home a couple times.

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Great advice above. I did similar with my mom: state ID in MI, downloaded DPOA form, notarized by friend (some bank's have tellers/managers with that). I gave copies to bank, drs, dentist, pension co, SS, insurance co, and any/all other parties that would need it. I did the DPOA for medical AND financial, easier to do ahead of time than in an emergency! Best of luck with your folks. ♥
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Ps. You should get an id bracelet for mom that she can't remove that lists her address and contact in case of emergency. Also take a recent picture of her and all her info and file with local police dept.

I talked my contact info and my relationship to my mom in the glove compartment of the car as well as in moms wallet and slipped multiple contact cards in most of her purses and coat pockets.
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Check old tax records or go to bank with dad -- they should have moms SSN so you can go and request new SSN card or identification. If she's got SS or Medicare card, etc. they should have the info. Even her dr or the hospital should have some record with her SSN and they may give it to you if you have HIPPA or dad requests.

As for POA, you should get both medical and financial is my advice. But if you just want medical, then you and dad need to get one drawn up legally and have elder law attorney advise.
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I got POA forms from Legal Zoom and had my parents initial those things they agreed I could and would, if needed take care of. It was the best thing I did for them. I sold my moms house and took care of all the paperwork, cleaning, going through her things for her, etc. she had just been widowed, was obviously getting dementia, and then my step dad killed himself. She was in another zone for months and because she lost over half their income, needed help getting out from under the house payment. She had already agreed that they needed to get a place closer to me. She is in assisted living and it took many months for her to adjust and understand why (and how) she had gotten there. Do it right away.
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an alternative to the state ID is a Passport.
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Sorry, but I should have said this:
SOS = Secretary of State
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I want to pass along a tip that the State of IL SOS gave me about the State ID:
1. Everyone should have an ID, either a Driver's License or a state ID. If you have someone you're taking care of, make sure you get them a State ID while they can still get up and around. The example that IL SOS gave was this: a person must go to the department of motor vehicles (or whatever it's called in your state) to get an ID. Don't want until they're bedridden to get one because, at that point, you can't get them over there for the ID. That's about when you really need it, but a little late to be getting it. Overall, it should make identity issues easier, though.
2. In the State of IL, you can have both a DL and a State ID. If you are over a certain age, you get the State ID free, I believe, and the SOS office suggests that, even if you have DL, that you get a State ID. That way, if you lose your DL, you have a State ID to fall back on for identification. Do not ever keep them in the same place. The example SOS gave was this: if your wallet is stolen with your DL but you have a State ID at home, you can go home to get your State ID to allow you to cash checks or to help get your new DL.
But, by contrast, the State of MI does not allow any resident to have both a DL AND a state ID.
So, check with your state. Every person should have at least one of them, but for states that allow both, get both if you're eligible for a reduced cost or free ID (or maybe get both if the person is kind of forgetful and tends to lose things, too).
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Take one day off work after you have obtained a copy of her birth certificate and go to the MVD and get an I.D. that does not include driving. They have them when people can no longer drive but still need to be identified, and you mother must be with you to prove to the MVD she is the person getting the I.D. They also have a former license with her photo on it that will prove who she is.
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Take a few days off and deal with some of this. First most states will have a State ID of some type usually you can get from the same place you get the drivers license from. You only need some proof of where they live like a tax bill for the house and if possible a birth certificate. You can get one even for someone that old (done it but it does take time) I would also consider investing the $500 or so with an elder attorney so they POA is correct. the "form" ones don't always do the trick as they tend to be more generic and don't always cover things that are specific to your state. I would also have a FULL financial and medical POA put in place NOW so later you have it if you need it.

Lastly have you considered both parents going into a nursing home or some type of elder care facility? That way your mom and dad can still be together, your dad can feel like he is still caring for your mom while they are both being cared for by the facility. From the sound of your description both would benefit by placement.

Call the Medicaid office in your area and see if one of their social workers can't assist you that is what they are there for.
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You can also go on-line and look for Durable POA then can take out sections you don't want or can change them to say that you DON'T want those things. Also, check your state. Some states have specific POA forms just for Health.

For example, the State of IL has its own POA forms that you can get from SOS or from the IL State Bar Assocation site for free that is ONLY for health and another that is ONLY for financial, and both are different from durable POA.

But make sure you get it notarized. The UPS store has notaries.
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