My sister has Alzheimer's and is forgetting to eat or thinks she has ate. Anyone experienced this? - AgingCare.com

My sister has Alzheimer's and is forgetting to eat or thinks she has ate. Anyone experienced this?

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My sister lives by herself & is in the country & refuses to move - so having meals on wheels delivered to her home is a problem. Leaving food for her in the fridge
to eat is still there two to three weeks later.Leaving frozen meals for her to heat up is no longer an option.She cannot turn her oven on because she forgets how to to do that task.

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Mom lost ten pounds last year because we could not monitor her. All we knew is that if we took her to lunch, she hadn't eaten breakfast (although she said she did) and often skipped dinner. When she did go to dinner, she would hide food from the IL restaurant in her purse so she didn't have to eat it. It would petrify in her purse or on a cabinet shelf. Malnutrition and dehydration just makes the dementia worse.
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Ditto. Your sister needs to be in assisted living. Her behavior is much like my mother's was. First she ate only tv dinners, then she stopped that. She couldn't work the oven, she burned up pots heating soup (the only thing she ate besides yogurt and sweets). Food we brought would rot in the fridge. Please, get your sister out of the house and into a facility who will look after her. It may take legal action for you to get a POA and declare her incompetent though.
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Good lord yes! This is dangerous. She needs 24/7 supervision either at home or in a facility.
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She is no longer safe alone. Find her a safe place. Get Guardianship and move her to 24/7 care before she burns the house down.
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