My mother (see the Doppelganger thread in the Alzheimer's category) is now taking her meds. There are dosage and potency issues. Any advice? - AgingCare.com

My mother (see the Doppelganger thread in the Alzheimer's category) is now taking her meds. There are dosage and potency issues. Any advice?

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When the psychiatrist originally prescribed an antidepressant and a medication to treat mood swings, she refused to take them. More recently, however, I have succeeded in convincing her to. I was concerned about her taking pills that may be losing potency--the prescription was filled mid-October--and she got strangely belligerent yesterday and I thought she might have taken a second dose (she took a first dose of the pills hours early). But the expiration on both meds is about a year from now...

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My Mom's sister had in fact insisted I should hand her the pill to take. But when I did that my Mom angrily threw the pill on the floor. She has not taken one since. The doctor told me over the phone, later, I should try to put the medication in her food. How I will do this when she is sitting there (and always facing the plate or bowl) I do not know.
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BarbBrooklyn Jul 19, 2018
Dougie; Can't you place the bowl on the counter in front of you, out of mom's sight? And then bring it to the table?
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Please keep in touch with the psychiatrist. You should be able to call him/her with concerns. Maybe the drug he prescribed is causing her problems. When I as in my thirties I had antidepressants that gave me thinking, concentration and memory problems. Just imaging those drugs with an older brain.
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Reply to Toadhall
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If your mother goes to the hospital and is an inpatient for 3 nights, she'll be eligible for Medicare-paid rehab. Once she's there, you explain to discharge planning that it's becoming impossible for you to get mom to be compliant with meds and that she is unsafe at home.

They will work with you to find a placement and to apply for Medicaid if that's needed.
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Reply to BarbBrooklyn
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I will need support from family members and even the lawyer (ref.: the key) before I can do this.
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Reply to Dougiemonty1
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If she gets sicker, you will call 911 and have her taken to the ER. I think she needs a higher level of care than you can giver her at home.

Have you thought about a care facility?
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Hope you're feeling OK, Dougie.

I wonder if other people on this forum might have ideas about how to convince your mom to take her meds. I'm wondering if it's possible to tell a fib and say it's a vitamin or....?
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I have had the thyroidectomy--because the gland became cancerous. She does not know the gland was removed or that it had cancer--she developed breast cancer in 1988 and she had a mastectomy. But what I am concerned about is that she will continue to refuse to take the medication and that the infection will spread...
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Reply to Dougiemonty1
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Aww, i am sorry to hear this, Dougie! How are you holding up? How is your health these days?
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Reply to SnoopyLove
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The matter has taken a dramatic--and unfortunate--turn. My mother started complaining about a pain in her mouth...because of my own preoccupations (including an MRI of my own) I was delayed in contacting her dentist's office. As it turned out, she did not have a toothache and was referred to her physician's office and that of an oral surgeon. She refused to fill out the forms at the oral surgeon's office, and now will not take the antibiotic (amoxicillin) prescribed by the physician. In fact she threw that capsule I handed her to the floor.
She is not scheduled to return to her dentist's office (where an oral surgeon is scheduled to treat her) until Wednesday next week.
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I saw an entry on Wikipedia about Quetiapine, that it should NOT be given to patients with dementia. My mother was originally diagnosed, after a series of tests in a hospital (including an MRI), as having "unspecified dementia." She has been taking the 25-mg. tablets daily--first one, then two, then three, at the doctor's direction. Since March of this year.
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