My mother is my father's POA (financial and healthcare). Is she able to attend a neuro app for MRI results consult without my Dad present? - AgingCare.com

My mother is my father's POA (financial and healthcare). Is she able to attend a neuro app for MRI results consult without my Dad present?

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MRI was completed during a recent Hospital stay... partly by request of my mother. Stubbornness along with denial, as well as, poor cognitive insight related to atrophy of the brain is preventing my dad from seeking medical assistance from a neurologist. My mom and I need to attend a consult with a neurologist to know what to expect and to get a more specific diagnosis. Are we able to do that without my dad's presence?

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I agree: the idea of going to the appointment without him sort of put me in mind of the sign outside the beauty parlour "EARS PIERCED WHILE YOU WAIT." It's not impossible to do without him but...

I don't know if this might be more palatable to him: explain to your father that this is a follow up to the MRI scan, i.e. without going into detail about what you think the neurologist might be looking for, and that now he's spent all that money on the scan he might as well hear the results.
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Reply to Countrymouse
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Is something like this authorized in the health care Living Will/Health Care POA? I would think it would be a condition precedent to making decisions, which is in fact the purpose of the POA.

You have to be informed to make decisions, so I think attending the appointment, even w/o your father present, is justified. Just be sure to check the authorizing language.

If you think the neurologist might not agree, take a copy of the authorizing document with you for the appointment. You probably should also explain that your father's position is not conducive to making decisions that might have to be made, and your presence and decision making capacity facilitates getting the care he needs, so it's part of his "continuing care" requirements.
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Reply to GardenArtist
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Jess, were you told that they "need to see the patient" by a nonmedical staffer, or a nurse, office manager, or the doctor him/herself?

I've found that doctors are much more approachable these days, and I've been able to get them to return my calls to discuss specific issues. You might try leaving a message for the doctor, or even dropping off a letter explaining the circumstances.

Staff members probably aren't authorized to make these kinds of decisions, but doctors are.

Another option is to go with your father; his "stubbornness" and "denial" may make it very clear why you and your mother need to be involved!
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Reply to GardenArtist
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It was an office staff member at the desk that relayed this to my Mom, however, due to the emotional heart felt plea coming from my Mom, she was told someone else from the office would be contacting her...I agree w/ your statement about contacting medical professionals directly and with other doctors (oncologist...etc.. ) a rapport has been established and both my parents call the NP or Doc directly, however, this is a new doctor. My Mom is very determined and will utilize all of her resources!! After you have jumped through the medical hoops for years, it can just be frustrating and exhausting... I thought I would reach out and see who else may have boarded this boat!! Thank you so very much for all of your help!! She just now has contacted their attorney for clarification and advice, so she can move forward fully versed on her rights as POA. Thank you again!
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Reply to Jessjoss
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If your mom is willing to pay for the doctor's time then there is no problem. But you can't expect his insurance to pay for an appointment that he doesn't attend! This is what the doctor's office is talking about. What's the first thing you do when you go to the doctor's? Show your insurance cards and pay your copay if you have one.

So perhaps emphasize to the staff that you are willing to pay for the office visit up front and you might be able to get what you want.
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Reply to NomadSE
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Your mother also needs a signed HIPAA document in order to be able to access medical records or discuss health care without the patient present. If they don't have authorization to talk with your mother or you included either at doctor's office or in POA paperwork, the doctor's office can get in a LOT of trouble if they discuss info without patient present.
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Reply to Guestshopadmin
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Jess, "way to go!" and congratulations to your mother for her determination!

Nomad, you raise an interesting issue, one about which I know nothing as I always accompanied my father on appointments. However, we've never been billed for telephone conversations when I've called PAs or spoke to doctors outside of the office.

Jess, just another thought. If the MRI was done at a hospital, there would be a report on it by whoever interpreted it. The neuro doctor would explain in understandable language. And, assuming he/she has access to hospital records (as do physicians here) if he/she practices at that hospital, then the interpretive report would be available through hospital records.

You could request that from that medical records department at the hospital.

That's what I've done. Then I could research all the terms I didn't understand and ask the follow-up doctor to explain the significance.
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Reply to GardenArtist
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I actually did encounter this situation with my mom. She was in a geri-psych facility and had a doctor's appointment scheduled. I called to let them know she was in the facility but that I wanted to keep the appointment and speak with the doctor. I had hcpoa at the time (now guardian) and had been with her to all appointments. But I was told, not without the patient because otherwise, if they bill insurance and don't see the patient it is insurance fraud. Since I couldn't afford to pay for the visit myself, that was that.

Now that said, I have found that specialists tend to be more willing to converse on the phone if you are hippa approved. My mom's cardiologist called ME to let me know the results of her device check and to call in a script for a blood thinner. No office visit required.

The chain docs offices with pa's and np's as your pcp, it's all about billing insurance.
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Reply to NomadSE
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I will have my Mother double check the POA documents for specifics. Unfortunately, the reason why I posted this question, was because of the doctor's office response ("we need to see the patient"). Of course my Mother explained the situation, which in my opinion can not be unheard of, based on the very common s/s of most dementias...impaired cognitive insight and the unawareness of one's own deficits!! Thank you for your response, any advice is extremely welcomed!
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Reply to Jessjoss
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Nomad is correct. The doctor needs to have the patient present. The neurologist will have to do his own testing before he will diagnosis. You can ask that you speak alone with the doctor after the exam. But, you may want the doctor to sit down with your Dad, look him in the eye and tell him what is wrong with him. That's what Moms doctor did. Explained that she may see people who no one else sees, etc. He may believe the doctor before he believes you. Ask when you make the appt if they want the results of the MRI before the appt. Make a list of all the things you have seen regarding Dad. Ask that the doctor see this before the exam. His exam will be such to look for this stuff or ask Dad questions regarding what you have written.
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