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She has just a little more than $2,000 in her combined checking & savings accounts. She has no other "assets" (property, home, vehicle, etc). I am her P.O.A. and a co-owner on those accounts. How can I get rid of it amount without making an "Intentional withdrawal"?

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It is not the withdrawal that causes problems, it is how it is spent. As long as the withdrawn money is spent on your mother, it is not a gift and therefore not a problem. The ideas presented by others, here, are good. A pre-paid funeral/burial is good if there is an amount that warrants that, e.g., $5,-10,000 or so. For smaller amounts, the spend-down ideas suggested by others here are the way to go!
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I'd suggest having her buy things that go MIA in a NH:
- extra Pairs of eyeglasses
- extra hearing aid & batteries
- if you have room for storage: extra panties, socks & if she wears camisoles extras or buy her a few front snap bras; extra shoes. My mom loved those horrid & not exactly cheap SAS shoes & there always always ended up with 1 shoe gone.
If still $ left
- subscription to large print magazine if she reads
- dental work
Basic Wheelchairs, walkers will be provided by either Medicare or medicaid. So imo if funds are limited buying her things that are not ever paid by the M&Ms are better use of $.

pay by check from her checking account and keep the receipt just in case Medicaid asks.

Remember mom will be allowed a small PNA- personal needs allowance- each month from the monthly income that goes to her copay. Varies by state (was $60 for my mom inTx). So there will be some smallish funds to pay for her visits to the on site @ NH beauty shoppe or some toiletries replacements.
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I have heard that you can purchase needed thing for her care. A wheelchair, disposable briefs, an alternating pressure mattress pad, a pad for her wheel chair, etc.
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Good thoughts from all! Also, would she play simple games on an iPad or touch screen laptop? It could be a connection for you both when you bring it in because you would not want to leave it there. A portable stereo to listen to CDs, or an audio book player? An item of furniture to store things on/in or maybe something smaller in the bathroom to keep her toiletries in? A lift chair? Lamp? Wall decor, picture frames, photo album? DVD player? Check with the activities director at your NH. That's where I got suggestions for larger ticket items that would fit my dad.

The monthly allowance can add up quickly if you do not have regular purchases. Our lawyer recommended we try to keep dad's assets between a few hundred to $1500 that way if we lapse watching it we do not get disqualified because we went over $10 one month. When our loved ones pass, whatever liquid assets are left will go to the NH or back to Medicaid.

Checks are okay, but you have to send in copies of each check and receipt. Here, they prefer debit card and all the info will be on the bank statement.

You can do this! I am a saver not a spender. I despise having to spend money just to spend money, but it is doable and without Medicaid help, they could not be cared for at the NH.
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You're in good shape so no worries... all great advice so far... think forward to bring it under the $2,000. Diapers, new toiletry needs, new comfy blanket or slippers, etc. Yes, use a check to pay for this stuff and keep receipt to show medicaid as necessary. Good luck! :-)
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Everyone is correct, never let the account go over 2,000 even by 1 cent. I got my mom PJ's warm ones, a new blanket, moisturizer she wanted, a small pocketbook for her lap, a knitted blanket to cover her legs. I brought her money down to 300.00. Also make sure her funeral plans are paid for and it is IRREVOCABLE, as well as her cemetery plots. Keep receipts of everything, if u can buy it on HER credit card do it and then pay for it by check and keep a copy of the check. They can be very strict and request all receipts, proof of payments etc. I had a hard time with Boscovs because they to do return checks or copy of the checks to the bank, and the stores don't have them. I had to contact the President of their corporate office and they had to get me a copy of a check payment from my mom's acct, from their micro film files. What a disaster. There are time frames to file, time frames to get them all their receipts and 5 yrs worth of bank statements. Time is of the essence. They give you a brief window of time to comply to their requests or they deny coverage. You don't want to be in that situation. Get your moms account down by getting her things she needs, and make sure you can prove they were FOR HER.
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My mom is not in the financial/Medicaid situation you describe, and as soon as her home sells should have sufficient amounts in the bank for her continued care. However, you never know what might happen so, on the advice of her eldercare attorney, pay everything either by check, or, preferably, with a singular credit card, one that gets cash back. I use Discover. The account is mom's and I have a card in my name. Everything possible goes on that card and I save all receipts. I pay the bill in full when it arrives and staple all receipts to the bill and file it. The credit card allows me to easily track monthly contributions to her favorite charities, purchase of paper goods and medicines ordered by the assisted living facility she just transferred to, clothing, Dr. visits, etc.
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igloo572 gave you excellent advise. right on target!
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Since this is income... unless she has a MONTHLY scheduled expense that qualifies, she is going to be deemed above that limit.

Have an attorney set up a Miller trust.

The income above $2000 is placed in the trust. She then is under the guideline. The trust is for Medicaid, and Medicaid is the sole beneficiary of it when she passes.
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Medicaid will tell you how to spend the excess so your mother will be eligible. It's just a phone call.
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