My mother-in-law is in need of a higher toilet is there financial help for both purchasing and installing of equipment that she needs?

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I found a "riser" at the local thrift store.
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I've seen lots of supplies like the commode, walkers, and other assistant products at our local Goodwill thrift store. I keep buying $10 walkers there as mthr gifts them to other patients!
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Fantastic idea about using the commode and adjusting the height!
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I've got to say that neither of our toilet extensions ever slid around, but I will agree that even the one that wasn't bolted on was a pain to keep clean. Make sure your bathroom has enough space around the toilet for a commode, I know it would not have fit in mom's tiny bathroom.

If you are going the commode route look for one with sturdy arms and be sure to get a splash guard - basically the bucket with an open bottom. If you don't already have a bath chair there are models that will do double duty, although more $$ they would save in the long run.
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Use the toilet chairs that straddle the existing toilet. They can be adjusted up or down about 8 inches. Don’t get the plastic riser. It’s just a big collar and will slide around on the toilet.
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Check with your social services. They may have a closetful of medical supplies of commode, walkers, wheelchairs, etc for free
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I had purchased the raised toilet seat but it keeps slidding on her which is also unsafe and it is hard to keep clean. I can see where it could also be challenging for them to sit on it properly. I do like the idea of getting the portable commode, that might be just what she needs. Thank you everyone for your help.
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What Erica said. You get a bedside portable commode. You take the pot part out as you would for emptying. You sit the frame which has the handles and seat over your existing commode. (Put the seat up on the existing commode first). This raises the seat of the commode, provides arms to use to help get up from the commode and to sit down.
Medicare pays for bedside commodes. Ask your doctor for a prescription. When necessary it can be used as portable commode when needed in bedroom (with pot). It’s also great as a bath chair. Sit it in the shower ( again without the pot portion) and it provides a secure place to sit while getting a shower and shampoo. 
You can build up the floor and install the standard commode on top of the elevated floor but it really isn’t necessary.
My mother also had one of the toilet seats you place on top of an existing toilet. It doesn’t have arms, isn’t nearly as easy to use.
She was tall and had bad knees for years. She had the portable one at a granddaughters house she liked to visit. The bedside commode one is better, again because of the arms.
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When my mom was still living at home, I used the commode frame and seat over the toilet which is adjustable for height
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There are plastic-type risers for a toilet that should be inexpensive that might solve the issue rather than hiring a someone to swap out the toilet.

On a side note: while a higher seat might make it easier for an elder to sit and rise, the elder might have problem seating correctly. Two years ago, I came home to give my sister, then the live-in caregiver, a break. The place reeked of urine. They said the toilet leaked. Great. Anyway, one of the purposes of my going home was to fix the many issues with Mom's house. I scrubbed around the toilet and then inspected and tested to see if the wax ring had dried, letting the flush water spill out. Nope. Turned out it was Mom's riser. Yeah, it was easy for her to stand and rise, but she couldn't get her bottom properly seated, and her front area hung over and ended up just peeing on the rim, down the toilet front, then onto the floor! Got rid of the riser and installed handles that attached to the back of the toilet so she could push herself up or down.
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