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Tumor brain glipblastom

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My Luz had aphasia. Her neurologist said there was nothing that could be done for her. Hers was called primary progressive aphasia related to her dementia. I hope it is different in your case.
The only thing that helped Luz was our frequent hugs.
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Ahmijoy May 17, 2019
Old Sailor, your reply brought tears to my eyes. How you must have loved your Luz! My husband’s stroke left him with aphasia as well and it still affects him today. I know how frustrated he gets and it’s difficult not to correct him, but the speech therapist said to let him figure it out himself, so I still do.

Your Luz was so lucky to have you.
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Look up picture boards in search. This are used to help communicate with those who can't talk.
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I’m not sure any medication will improve her aphasia as this is because of her glioblastoma.
How old is your mother?
Is she still undergoing radiation and chemo?

I say this gently...glioblastomas are fast growing tumors and if you haven’t already thought about palliative care or hospice it may be time.

Sometimes they treat these tumors with a medication called Decadron. This causes the brain and spinal cord area fluid to shrink a little bit but not enough to allow pressure to be taken off the area of the brain that controls speech.

For me, having aphasia must be devastating for the patient. Imagine you want to say something and can’t get the words out even though you may know perfectly well what it is you are asking for but you can’t communicate succinctly. I am sorry your mother is going through this.
I will suggest if you haven’t already, get her a writing board to help her communicate, or even home made flash cards.
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I just read up on this. Her not being able to talk may be caused by the surgery, correct? It also read that chemo and radiation may follow. Her doctors should be able to help in what meds she should be taking.

One of our members may have had something similar with a LO and can help.
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Fatoop May 17, 2019
She is 55 years old. Maybe is from surgery but the doctor even care about my mother he said that it is from the tumor . She also had a stroke . She can't move also with her right side.
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I'm sorry your mother has glioblastoma, the reality may be that the speech area of her brain has been too damaged by the tumour and surgery to hope for any recovery. The progression of her symptoms will depend on the location of the tumour, my brother never lost the ability to swallow until he was end of life and his passing was peaceful. If you are a reader the book Being Mortal might be helpful to you

https://www.agingcare.com/products/being-mortal-medicine-and-what-matters-in-the-end-433866.htm
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Reply to cwillie
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You can request a speach consult and be with her to ask questions. Unfortunately you mention she has a glioblastoma which surgery can buy some time although this tumor is fast and unrelenting. She will soon not be able to swallow. I am sorry for you, but you may have to just spend what good days you have left.
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Reply to MACinCT
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You can Google a lot of information about aphasia on the net, almost certainly more than anyone here can give you. I know that the brain can make new connections that help, because it did with my sister. However it took years and years (she was 26 when the stroke happened). You need lots of patience if the words are hard to find, rather than the situation when she can’t speak at all. Best wishes.
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Reply to MargaretMcKen
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I am so sorry that your mom and you are going through this. But there is nothing anyone here can do for your mom. We are here for support!

Dysaphasia is a neurology disorder. None of us could help even the ones with medical knowledge. We don't know your mom's history, surgeries, medications (if any). There is so much more to this. Plus, adding that your mom has a brain tumor there is no medication for that. There is chemotherapy and radiation.


We are here to support you and help with other questions, but your mom needs a Neurologist.

Again I am sorry:(
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Reply to Shell38314
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She needs to see a doctor. We don’t know her medical history, what kind of surgery she had, how old she is, whether she has dementia, etc. even if we did know these things and we were medical professionals, we shouldn’t give out medical advice on an anonymous forum. If something worked for us, it could be dangerous for someone else and you can’t get medications without a doctor anyway.
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