Help!! My mom REFUSES to be alone! - AgingCare.com

Help!! My mom REFUSES to be alone!

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Help! My mom is 71 years old and recently diagnosed with Parkinson's. She lived in the basement of a house she shared with her twin sister. We knew the stairs to the basement were unacceptable since she's already struggling to walk. We moved her into a senior community a block away. Her twin moved to the apartment below her. I'm not sure if it's from the move or her diagnosis, but she will NOT be alone!! Not even for 1 hour. I drop her off at home and before u get to my car she's asking to come back to my house. She won't do anything for herself, even though I think she's capable. She wanted to come over today after spending the week with me, I told her I need a day with my hubby. She freaked out, screaming and crying!! Then when I calmed her down she called my sister, who couldn't pick her up immediately. She again FLIPPED OUT. She even called me claiming she was outside and was attacked by a man. After further questioning, I knew this not to be true. She called the police any way. Is this the disease? Manipulation? Has anyone else dealt with this?? HELP!

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It could be the Parkinson’s hallucinations. My Papa thought someone was standing behind his shoulder. One night he thought someone broke into his house. So what your Mother said could fit into those kind of scenarios. There is medicine that can control them. The medicine is then tapered down and discontinued until the next time the problem arises.
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Jeanne and Golden, we will be reporting her behavior to the doc on Monday. It really is hard to know what's the disease and what's manipulation. I won't describe her manipulative past, I wouldn't want anyone to judge her. Just know it was REALLY bad when I was a child.
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Bestgardner, I'm so very sorry to hear that!! The family and I had a meeting and were trying to figure out her fears. I would NEVER abandon my mother no matter how hard it gets. I really appreciate all the comments I've received on this post, as it makes me feel less alone. Mom is seeing a new Neurologist on Monday. I hope they can find some medication that helps. Like I said, I'm so surprised she's not on any at this time.
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Some of the dopamine agonist, such as myrapex and ropinerol, have severe side effects. Nightmares , haluccinations, leaving your loved one scared and afraid. It is extremely lonely in a senior living, especially when you were surrounded by family and friends. I think you are wonderful to be trying to help your mom. My children left me alone, put me in a homeless shelter and left me at an emergency room all alone, when they saw I was broken due to PD. Your mom doesn't even understand what her brain minus dopamine cells is doing to her. The symptoms are very different among PD patients. Getting the right combination of meds takes months and years. Talk privately with your mom, assure her you will always help her through this. Read and educate yourself with everything Parkinson. Join a support group, it is very traumatic to have to change your life the way it has been for years. To be broken and not useful, to be taken out like trash.
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New, how are you, and how is your mom?
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new - wondering how you are. I think it is impossible to figure out what is "the demands" and what is "the disease". If it is unreasonable, maybe it doesn't matter other than any new behaviours should be reported to her doctor. One thing that does matter is that you look after yourself in all of this, as it is very stressful and you probably have a long bumpy road ahead of you. You have to put your oxygen on first, as in a plane.

For my own sanity, I had to let some calls go to voicemail and check them for real issues later. Mother had forgotten about them by evening. Your mum has a serious illness and needs care. You do not have to give all that care personally. She may not be able to live alone much longer. I hope she has excellent medical care as she goes through this. They should be a great help to you and her. ((((((hugs))))))
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More than half of people who have Parkinson's Disease develop dementia. The dementia can show up ten years after original PD diagnosis. And it can also show up much earlier. If the dementia symptoms start within one year of the Parkinson symptoms, the condition is considered Lewy Body Dementia. (Please note. I am not saying that your mother has any kind of dementia. But you should be aware of the possibility.)

PDD and LBD progress in different ways than ALZ does. Most general dementia descriptions are based on ALZ, so some of what you read will not match the behavior of a person with PDD or LBD.

Delusions and visual hallucinations occur early in PDD or LBD. I wonder if your mom is seeing things that frighten her? Has she mentioned anything that might indicate that? Delusions are false beliefs. What does she believe will happen to her if she is left alone? I wonder if she "saw" her "attacker"? Did she describe him? I heard this story at an LBD conference: Man checks into motel with wife. A little later wife runs into the office saying a strange man is in her room. She is terrified. Clerk calls police and asks where her husband is. She is confused. Husband? Why would her husband be here? A little later the officer comes into the office with a man and says, "Ma'am, look who I found -- your husabnd!" She runs into his arms and is very grateful that she is not in danger. She had early stage LBD and temporarily believed her husband to be a stranger. It is a good thing the officer was willing to test out the man's explanation, and that his wife recognized him by then!

What kinds of things do you believe that your mother can do that she insists she needs help with?

Does your mother have sleep disturbances?

I am so glad you are scheduled with a doctor soon. Be as detailed as you can be in your description of her behavior.
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Ok, I'll definitely have her checked!
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No. No pain many times. Just dementia type symptoms. Not the type of symptoms you might expect such as burning, etc.
Get her checked.
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It was the end of Dec early Jan. I was at work and she called saying she couldnt use the bathroom. I called her a taxi and she went to urgent care, then they sent her to the Urologist. Would she have pain with a UTI?
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