My mom has breast cancer and possible metastatic brain cancer. Would either of those contribute to dementia?

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She had not received any treatment for her breast cancer which was first noticed by her doctor back in Oct 2014.
Recent cat scans (due to 2 separate falls) revealed “many nodules “ on her left lung (under the breast tumor), and also some “growths that are eating away at her skull” as said by the ER doctor recently.
My question is is there any correlation between what’s happening to my mom's brain & if she’s getting dementia?

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A late long-time friend had metastatic breast cancer.
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My sister had breast cancer which went to her back and then to her brain. She became "out of it". Don't know if it can be called demenia. The cancer will disrupt the part of the brain it's in. If it's speech then that will be effected. If breathing and heart that will be effected. etc. You don't say how old Mom is. If she didn't want to do things 3 yrs ago, she probably won't do anything now. I would call Hospice in to help make her comfortable.
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I would say it would, but I am not a medical doctor. Best to get her seen by her specialist as soon as possible.
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I don't know about dementia, but I'd be surprised if the cancers haven't affected her cognitive abilities.

Does it really matter if dementia is mentioned? It won't change the circumstances and is just another 'label' to put on your mom.

With such major health problems, it is no wonder about her losing her cognitive abilities. She must be a strong woman to be bearing this at all.

Praying for you.
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So sorry u r experiencing this. Is your mom in Hospice care?
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My mother had unoperable abdominal soft tissue cancer which responded some to radiation but the tumor never fully went away. She then developed lung nodules and began having infections from deterioration of the bladder walls due to the radiation. She had a fall, another UTI was discovered and she went into delirium several times within the last 2 years of her life. She was in and out of delirium despite antibiotic treatment. This entire episode, from the cancer diagnosis to her death lasted 13 years. She had several trips to the hospital, rehabs in nursing homes that couldn't help anymore. The best thing we did was call hospice in. They were truly a God send for her and for us. I took her home to care for her 24/7 and cannot imagine what it would have been like without the wonderful support of hospice.
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Untreated breast cancer can also spread to the bones (which could explain the skull comment). You need to schedule an appointment with your mother and doctor to get an explanation of exactly what is happening. Does she have an oncologist (cancer doctor)? She may be a candidate for hospice and related treatment, and it sounds like it may be worth it. You say that your mother is still living at home?
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Hi Hangingon, your poor mom -- I'm so sorry about the added diagnoses. How are you doing?
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ANYTHING in the brain can cause any number of "oddities" in behavior. Depends on where the brain is being affected. This is something you should be talking to her Drs about. I would think that any assault on the brain (radiation, chemo) is going to result in some behavioral changes.
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Has your mother had any radiation for the metastasis to her brain? If so, that could contribute to symptoms of dementia, such as forgetfulness and confusion. I saw that with my sister after she had the whole brain rads. There's a phenomenon called "chemo brain".

At this point, though, I think the focus will be on keeping her comfortable, and just recognizing that her outlook, thoughts, and behavior will become more challenging for her as the cancer metastasizes.
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