My mom (age 90) now lives with me and has a comfortable nest egg established. Can Mom spend any of her money to make household purchases? - AgingCare.com

My mom (age 90) now lives with me and has a comfortable nest egg established. Can Mom spend any of her money to make household purchases?

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If she should pass away within 5 years and is in a nursing home, will I be obligated to pay back for those purchases?

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Why not go to a lawyer for a caretakers agreement contract? If your Mom is competent she can spend her money as she wants to, but if she isnt, you cannot spend it. You are entitled to getting paid for her care. Siblings helping? IF not, why should they reep the benefits of your moms nestegg when you are doing all the work? I bought things for my Mom with her money but she has dementia/alz. I bought her a new mattress set, tv, recliners, shoes, clothes, diapers, etc but these are for her, not us. Save all receipts and bank statements. Hope this helps.
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YOU ARE VERY HONEST BECAUSE YOU ARE ASKING BEFORE YOU START SPENDING YOUR MOTHER'S MONEY. I would ask her to give me some money to pay for her food, clothes, furniture (recliner) to make her life more comfortable, but if she can get it using her medical insurance, don't spend her money on it. Keep all the receipts with you in a safe place. Yes, is good to talk to a lawyer, before you starts using her money. Don't use it for yourself because that's is illegal, unless your mother is mentally capable of authorize you to do so, but it's doesn't look right that you spend her money on yourself.
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I am not an expert in this field, but I would think that your mother could spend money on whatever she pleases. If you have specific concerns perhaps talking to a discussion with an elder lawyer and see what limitations there are on her spending.

An elder lawer will help her 'plan' for future care, and other 'needs' and other arrangements and wishes. Doing these things may seem 'morbid' but they are necessary.

I am sure that the experts on this site will chime in with sage advise.
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