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Link - well there probably is an embedded chip that could be done but probably cost prohibitive as it would be custom.
As an aside on teeth, although not for your dad as he’s gotten his pulled- for my late mom she did basically a huge spend down on dental care & on retrospect it was the best use of asset $$$. It wasn’t planned to be done for Medicaid spend down per se but more that I was over hearing about teeth issues and I knew her dentist /staff well enough to come up with a doable plan (implants with 2 upper spans and lower implants with front span). All private pay but he did hefty discount. Once mom went into NH basically theres no real daily brushing or oral health care unless the resident can do it pretty well entirely on their own. Otherwise those red sponge tipped swaps are it for NH dental. So many residents seemed to eventually have issues eating, gum diseases, decaying teeth. Those with dentures seemed to always be missing them. Then there was my mom, happily able to chomp down on anything, eating a varied diet, not passing anything up and as implants nothing was going to get lost. I’ll never forget nursing staff comments as to how “daily eating” with its deciding which flatware, cutting foods, picking up, chewing & swallowing, etc. all helped fire up daily cognitive ability & those with healthier teeth = healthier NH stay. Something I’d never thought about.  Really if folks are looking for legit spend down for Medicaid PLEASE consider dental. Yes, expensive but better imo than weaselling around on how to transfer w/out Medicaid finding out
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I will second the comment about the Tile tracker. I have located my Dad's wallet several times using the app on my iPhone.

What I really need is something that would track where he left his false teeth.

:-)
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Linda and Igloo, thanks for the information. I really like this idea. Too many things are in hiding now and it frustrates Dad, and me.

It's heartwarming to learn of tech devices being used for serious purposes, like finding missing things for seniors. So much of that tech culture hasn't appealed to me b/c it's just not what is needed in our situation.

I'm going to do some more research and find out what would be the best for our situation.

Thanks again!
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Tile is pretty fabulous. With or W/O cognitive issues.

For those concerned about costs, Tile is ubiquitous enough that they are getting to be a promotional item at more tech forward trade shows. A client brought me a couple he snagged at Siggraph ‘17, a pity gift as I’m on Tile V1.0! It’s replace the imprinted flash drive for a giveaway. So this Holiday season ask your still going to conferences/ trade show family members if they picked up any or would be on the lookout for them in 2018.

Btw the bedraggled bear in the Tile commercial is so perfect heart tugging.
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A similar product to Tile is TrackR. I have one on my Dad's phone and one on each of our dogs.
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GA, they work off of Bluetooth and I think they work on any smartphone - you just download the app. You sync the Tile to the phone initially. To use the phone to locate the keys, you open the app, touch the key name and the Tile on the key sounds a little musical tone. To use the keys to locate the phone, you press the center button on the key Tile twice and the phone makes a tone. On the phone, you can also see a dot where the key is in relation to where you and the phone are.....it's like the kids game of "warmer, warmer, hot!"
I think the Tiles are fantastic for anyone with cognitive issues. Life is challenging enough for such people so it's nice for them to have one less stressor.

Cacie, after you find the wallet, photocopy everything in it (if you haven't already). It gives you piece of mind should the wallet get lost.
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Stacey, I've found that those chair cushions are also good hiding places for errant devices or wallets. They're the first place I look now.
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Such great ideas!!! I lost my billfold just prior to Christmas one year and I was only 26 at the time, a young mother, and both my husband and I had just deposited our paychecks into our bank account, ready to do our Big Christmas Shopping trip for the kids presents.

I was frantic, hubby was angry with me, and I searched for many hours over the weekend to no avail. Finally, needing to do laundry for the coming work week, I started a load, and right there next to the washing machine, there it was! I know that I had looked there, but in my frustration, had completely overlooked it. A weekend lost, many arguments later, but I found it! Those were the days before debit cards, no banks were open open over the weekend, and there was no way to check with the bank to see if someone had been using our accounts.

So it can happen to anyone, and often during times of stress, as we were young, and still in the days of struggling financially. I think in the case of someone with Dementia, those TILES you can purchase are a great idea, I would like to get some for my absent minded husband, for sure¡ he looses Everything, keys, glasses, his belt! He is forever asking me if I've seen this or that!

Good Luck, don't despair, it is not the end of the world, and it will probably turn up in a place you've already looked in, try down in the couch or chair cushions!
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Linda, I'm totally unfamiliar with "tiles". Are they electronic chips locators? I assume you have to have a specific app for them? Does that require an iPhone?

I've often joked that I'd like to have a scanning bar coded system for all the devices that go missing. Sounds like you've found one.
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Cacie, we were constantly looking for keys, wallet, cellphone - I bought a set of Tiles at my local cell phone store (you can get them online, too). We put a Tile on the car keys and there's a larger, flat tile that goes in the wallet. You use the cellphone app to locate the keys and wallet, and those Tiles help you find the phone. I can't tell you how much this has reduced my daily frustration level - this weekend, we located the wallet which had been put in the car trunk for safe keeping. They're about $25 each but like the old Mastercard commercial - cost of Tile $25 cost of sanity - priceless.
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Check the pockets of his jackets, pants and the laundry.
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I certainly am familiar with this situation! I've been experiencing it more and more as caregiving accelerates. And it's really frustrating.

I would try to turn it into a project, done little by little with relief in between to relieve the anxiety.

But first, when was the last time he used it, and when was the last time he remembers seeing it? If he doesn't remember, and he uses credit cards, check your card issuer's automated system to find out the date of last use, then work from there. Same process if he wrote a check, although a check might not necessarily clear as quickly as a credit card charge would be processed.

If you can recreate the events of the last days, from the last time he used it, you can start there. E.g., if you went out to lunch or dinner, what happened after you came home? Do you usually change clothing, and if so where is that clothing? Has it been checked?

I've found that these adventures of devices and other things usually occur after switching to home clothing after being out of the house.

Sometimes they even make it as far as the laundromat. Doublechecking of all pockets helps find errant devices.

Also, look for a while, take a break and relax, then search again. I've missed something I've been frantic to find just because I was frantic. Looking again the next day, it was exactly where I was looking but I wasn't calm enough to see what I was really doing.

If your husband wants to take the closet apart, make it a project to sort out seasonal clothing and put it away, donate to charity, or whatever....just something to switch from frantic mode to contemplative and slower mode so you can re-examine what you find w/o accidentally passing it over because of anxiety.
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