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If your husband's talking all night long is something new that he has never done in the past, you should make an appointment with his doctor - not so much because I think there's a serious problem with him but because I'm worried that it will cause a serious problem for you over time. That problem is lack of sleep. While eating healthy and exercising are also important for caregivers, sufficient sleep is a top priority. I'm a bit concerned about the groaning in that it may be an indication that he is having pain somewhere. Many people with arthritis have difficulty falling asleep because they can't get comfortable. No matter how they turn, something hurts. Depending on past medical history and other medications taken, it might be appropriate for him to take Tylenol or Advil (in the lowest dose that will allow them to be comfortable and fall asleep). It is possible that if pain is the underlying culprit here, with a simple over-the-counter pain med as prescribed by his MD or health care provider (HCP) 45 - 60 minutes before bed, he may sleep through the night and as a bonus - even stop talking all night! In a previous response it was suggested that Gabapentin helped with sleep. The reason that it would help with sleep is because it is used to relieve nerve or neuropathic pain. Diabetics often use this for problems with their feet which become worse at night. I would try to stay away from prescription medications unless recommended by his HCP. You'll want to address this issue sooner rather than later because your sleep is of utmost importance - especially now during the current pandemic.

I couldn't find any diagnoses listed for your husband. I'm going to assume that he may be affected by dementia or some type of memory disorder. Whenever he sees anything that you don't see, he is having a hallucination. Now as long as it doesn't frighten him and he doesn't hear any voices tell him to take any action, you may be able to just observe this for a while. I helped care for my dad with Alzheimer's disease for 14 years and your situation brought back memories that made me smile. My dad would sit on the front steps and across the street by the curb were 2 h-u-g-e oak (don't quote me) trees 25 feet apart. As evening rolled around dad refused to watch Wheel-of-Fortune with my mother. Instead he opted to watch the women and babies swinging back and forth in those trees hanging up pictures and mirrors... obviously way more interesting than Vanna or Pat Sayjack! Around 10 p.m. or whenever my mom decided it was time for them to go to bed, she would demand that he come inside. When he would refuse, I'd always get a call and she'd complain about him making up stories because she didn't see anyone in the trees.... She just couldn't let him enjoy his harmless hallucination. Instead, she would cause an argument. I'd talk to him about what he saw and tell him it was too bad that mom couldn't see it too but he could go back and watch them again tomorrow after a good night's sleep. No arguing. No problem. It's important to remember that there's more than one way to skin a cat. If the hallucinations aren't dangerous and he doesn't feel threatened or hear voices, p-l-e-a-s-e let him believe what he sees. There are ways to "sort of" agree without actually agreeing that you see it too. You might say, "I don't see it right now but I believe that you see it and I'm glad you enjoy it." There are going to be battles and wars during a journey with dementia. This is a very small battle that just isn't worth winning. With that said, my dad had some behavioral issues for a 3 month period during that 14 years, he was started on a medication called an antipsychotic. His behavior returned to normal but he was so disappointed because the women and the babies went away too and he missed them. Once tapered off the medication, the undesired behaviors fortunately never returned. Dad was able to watch the women and their babies for several more years.
Please see PCP
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Reply to AginginPLaceLLC
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Seeing children seems to be a common hallucination - often with Lewy Body Dementia but other types of dementia too. They don't seem to be distressing - just become part of life. I've wondered if they are actual memories replaying or not. Maybe they are behind superstitious folk seeing ghosts? Or the 'little people' many cultures have, like the Irish have Leprechauns.

If they ARE causing distress seek mediacal advice though (Geriatrician if possible).

You may need a separate bedroom to enable a solid nights sleep yourself, or maybe good earplugs.
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Reply to Beatty
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Gabapentin is very effective for both the sleep problems and hallucinations. Talk to his doctor.
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Reply to Bridger46164
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Does he have Parkinson's Disease? Sleep disorders and this type of hallucination can happen to PWP (People with Parkinson's).
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Reply to vegaslady
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