My grandmother is 93 years old and has severe dementia, she suffers from severe prolapse. I do not know what else we can do for her.

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She doesnt sleep at all, at this time she sleeps randomly in 30 minute increments and is practically up all night. She also has a very bad back posture that has curved her spine completely. I do not know what else we can do for her. The prolapse makes her feel as if she needs to pee constantly. We have taken her to MD and I was told that she doesn't have UTI.

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thank you DeeAnna I will mention this to her family doctor. I appreciate your help.
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jessnana, thank you for answering all of our questions.

My aunt had a severe "widow's hump" and when she walked she was looking at the floor. She had to tilt her head backwards to be able to see where she was walking. She was tiny so the walker had to be modified to suit her altered posture.

I wonder if the walker is the wrong size for your grandmother. Maybe the height needs to be adjusted so that her arms are in a more natural position when she is using the walker. Maybe one of the cross bars is in the way of her head or chest? Try walking bent over like your grandmother and see how the walker feels to you. Maybe her doctor can have physical therapy evaluate her walker and adjust it so that it fits her better.
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Oh I am sorry Barb i didn't answer the sleep issue question, the doctor said we could give her benadryl or OTC tea's to help her sleep. But all and any medication or OTC's gives her a reverse affect, instead of making her sleepy it keeps her alert. She takes Tramadol for her back pain as well.
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BarbBrooklyn: thank you for your questions, she sees a regular family doctor. I will contact her family doctor today to see if we can get into see a Geriatrics MD and see if that helps. Thank you for that info.

DeeAnna: thank you for the questions i will hopefully answer all of them.
she sleeps in a bed in a sitting position with special bed pillows for her to be able to sit up. We haven't tried a CPAP machine the doctor didn't mention she would need this but i will mention at her next appointment. As for her "widow's hump" she was dx'd w/levoscoliosis via a CT scan, her primary told us it was a form of Scoliosis. When she walks she walks facing down. She does walk with a 3 prong cane or walker but hates the walker. One of us will help her onto toilet and back onto bed or coach each time she goes to the bathroom or to eat. I haven't notice it affect her breathing, i will look out for this. As for the prolapse it is a bladder prolapse that she has a pessary in place for, the only thing her doctor could do at that time (which was many years ago).

shakingdustoff: thank you for your suggestions I will take this back to my family and see when we can get her in to see a urologist. I appreciate the positive feedback we will not give up on her.
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I have a "FEW?" questions:
Does your grandmother sleep in a bed or a recliner or what? If in bed, does she sleep on her side or on her back and what type of support does she use while sleeping? Does she use a CPAP machine while sleeping? What part of her spine is curved? Does she have a "widow's hump" where the curvature of the spine is the upper back resulting in your Grandmother bending forward so that she is looking at the floor when she is standing? Is her breathing affected by the curve of her spine?

What type of prolapse does she have--uterine or bladder? Both types make a person feel like they have to pee constantly even when they do not have a UTI. What treatments have been used to correct or minimize this problem?

Thanks for answering these "FEW" questions as it will help me to evaluate your grandmother's health problems better and help develop some possible solutions for your Grandmother's problems.
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What did the doctor do to address her sleep issues?

Is she seeing a geriatrician or a regular internist? She may be better off seeing a geriatrics doctor who will take the whole patient AND her caregiver into account.
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