My father in law is 71 and has recently started believing that his dreams are actually real, is this a sign of dementia? - AgingCare.com

My father in law is 71 and has recently started believing that his dreams are actually real, is this a sign of dementia?

Follow
Share

Not only does he believe that his dreams are real, he has lost his sense of inhabition. He will say inappropriate things. Like, talk about sex in front of his children and grandkids.... He has had several dreams and then announced that he is in love with the people he has dreamed about.. one being his ex daughter in law and the mother of his grandchildren.. another was the wife of one of his dear friends who he says is dieing because this happened in his dream... Please help if you know what I need to do... He asked my mother to have sex with him, while we were at a family Christmas get together in front of my children and grandchildren... His wife passed away two years ago and my father passed away 6 months before that so he has decided he is in love with my mother as well... This is causing some ackward moments and much stress....

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
2

Answers

Show:
I love you and I found your posting while I too was searching for help. My brother is a lucky man to have a wife like you and he is so torn as what to do.. I sometimes feel like me being so hard on daddy is to much but it is because I love him and only want him to have a fulfilling life. Mama wanted him to live a good life, after she was gone and I promised her that I would try my best to make sure... I know you thought I did not care but I love him more than anyone actually knows. You have always been more like my sister than my sister-in-law. I know I have not always made some of the best decisions as to who is good for me in my life but I have learned so much from it and I do know I love this last one. I have learned no one is perfect and maybe that is what I need, one that I feel like needs me...
Now back to Daddy,, I don't want him going to a nursing home but my brother is stressed and has no idea what to do.. We need to go see a Elder lawyer, get a power of attorney and we decide I should be his guardian... We need to do this to protect everything him and mama worked so hard for... I am hoping we can find a assisted living program to help him at home... If that does not work then we will have no other option than to seek professional help for him. But, in the meantime we need to understand what he has is real and it will not get much better or go away. We can not avoid or overlook the issue. It is here and will not just go away. We need to have done something about it yesterday and not let it get this far, but none of us wanted to believe this was happening to us.. I have actually seen first hand now how he is and he truly needs help, especially after what happen the other night. You know everyone in town is talking about it by now. I know this will all calm down once we get something going to try and make daddy's life is better. But, whatever it takes to make sure he is safe it what we will need to do. Thanks for being a part of my life and I too am lucky to have a sister like you...
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Short answer - yes, this is dementia at work. It sounds more fronto-temporal than Alzheimer's if that helps any.

I'm sorry, This is the start of a slow, painful road unless it proves to be at least temporarily reversible medically. My mom had a hard time with some dreams and would sometimes be convinceable that they had not realy happened and other times get really mad for me telling her it was just a dream. Adjusting some of her meds helped her not to have such vivid dreams, but her thinking skills and judgement were really not any better.

For my dad, there were some sweet moments though, as he began to confabulate things he wished woudl have happened. We found out that he really really wished he could have been in the Navy and been closer to his brothers, plus he would have adopted my kids if I hadn't.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Related
Articles
  • The AgingCare.com forum is filled with people coming together to share valuable information. We’ve compiled experienced caregivers’ best suggestions for devices and programs to help locate and identify dementia patients who wander.
  • While caregivers and their loved ones affected by dementia should not give up hope of leading rewarding and enjoyable lives, it is important to be realistic about an Alzheimer's or dementia diagnosis.
  • The stories we hear and the stories we tell define who we are and how we perceive our world. Alzheimer's is perceived by many as a story-stealer, but a courageous group of caregivers and patients aim to change the view of Alzheimer's disease.
  • The AgingCare.com forum is filled with people coming together to share valuable information. We’ve compiled experienced caregivers’ best tips for preventing elopement during episodes of wandering.
  • As a dementia patient, I can still handle the chaos of Christmas Day, but I expect there will come a time when I can no longer cope.
  • For a person diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, feelings of chaos and confusion are commonplace. People living with Alzheimer's offer caregivers their perspective on what it's like to live with the disease.
Related
Questions