My father has restless leg syndrome that is no longer able to be controlled by drugs. He's depressed and unable to sleep. Is there any hope?

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I would strongly suggest seeing another doctor possibly a neurologist. I have had RLS since I was in my 30s and was blessed to be seeing a doctor who recognized what it was when I described it. I didn't start on meds until a later date and was on carbidopa-levadopa at first and I am now on Mirapex three times a day and only occasionally have break through symptoms. I do think it makes me drowsy but that is certainly the lesser of two evils. I don't know how I would live without it. My doctor also prescribed Klonopin for nights when I had trouble getting to sleep and told me how important good sleep is for all of the parts of our bodies. Good luck. I
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Thanks everyone for your comments. It is a challenge. At this point it is hard to know what to do. The meds that used to work no longer do. His doc is kind of ignorant and pooh-poohing of his complaints. Symptoms are worse than ever. He is 87 and up until 2 months ago was vital, sharp and healthy. Now he shuffles around all day, he is exhausted and is at the end of his rope. I'm afraid he will have to be institutionalized as he feels like he can't do anything--won't leave the house, can't (or won't) attend to activities of daily living. Obsesses all day long about his jumpy legs. I try to distract him and tell him to at least go outside and breathe fresh air or talk to friends but he can't seem to talk about anything except his condition.
Anyway, this is a miserable disease.
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I have had restless leg for almost 20 years. Was not getting restorative sleep and my body was showing the signs of it. Had a sleep test about 5 years ago and was finally diagnosed with RLS. I have been on Requip for 5 years and just got bumped up to 4mgs / night. My legs start to act up as early as 3PM. I can't take the meds until before bedtime as it makes me nauseous after about 1/2 hour.
Some nights are unbearable and I feel I could fall asleep standing up, but my legs won't quit. Hence the raise in dosage. I am only 59, and completely understand what your dad is going through. I have been at home for over 2 years now, caring for my mom, 24/7. Some days can be a challenge when I don't get a good nights sleep.
A few suggestions would be, watch his sugar intake, and definitely keep him away from caffeine!!! These are 2 things that make RLS much worse. Also, that last couple hours before bedtime should be quiet and relaxing. Going to bed after any kind of activity is not good. I hope this helps.
Good luck to your dad.
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There are a lot of meds available now -years ago when my husband first had the problem most docs did not even know about the condition-there is a restless leg organazion that sends out newsletters for a small donation-I do not remember the name of it but they are up to date with the current meds for the condition-it often is passed down in families and where one med will not work on a person another will so you may have to try some out before you find the one that works-the best is to find a neurologist who will be able to work with you-it is a very hard disease to live with but there are many meds out there now-when my husband started having problems the docs made him feel like he was crazy until our son found an artical in the paper many years ago and it was such a relief to him to have a name for this problem.
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