My father has alz. the disease is taking over really fast. I think his deafness plays a big role. - AgingCare.com

My father has alz. the disease is taking over really fast. I think his deafness plays a big role.

Follow
Share
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
2

Answers

Show:
Deafness is very isolating, and it also interferes with the ability to assimilate new information and keep the brain active. You are right that it may be contributing to the Alz. progression. Talk to his doctor and see if he thinks better hearing aids may help. This is going to be hard, so take care of yourself.
Carol
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

He has one hearing aid he lost the other. Problem is he won't wear them and can't afford to buy anything else. Insurance does not cover the cost. He and mom were in denial of the disease and when mom passed away almost two years ago it hit dad hard and he has gone in a downward spiral since. He is now in adult breifs and needs help showering. We do have him in an assisted living home and they are really good with him but that boxes him up also. Every change sends him further down hill. Family and freinds don't understand until they visit him and then they say o' wow, I'm sorry you have to go through this. People don't know how fast he is changing and how hard it is until they are dealing with it or they see just a little bit of it. When will they find a cure not just knumb them up. They can transplant lungs and operate on the brain but can't figure out how to stop alz. I look into everything possible, scared to death I will also be inflicted with this horrible disease god created.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Related
Articles
  • While caregivers and their loved ones affected by dementia should not give up hope of leading rewarding and enjoyable lives, it is important to be realistic about an Alzheimer's or dementia diagnosis.
  • The AgingCare.com forum is filled with people coming together to share valuable information. We’ve compiled experienced caregivers’ best tips for medications that may help minimize dementia behaviors like wandering.
  • People with Alzheimer's and dementia often experience difficulty with recalling the names and faces of their family, friends, and professional care team. In some cases, though, all they need is a little help to mentally connect the dots.
  • As a dementia patient, I can still handle the chaos of Christmas Day, but I expect there will come a time when I can no longer cope.
  • The stories we hear and the stories we tell define who we are and how we perceive our world. Alzheimer's is perceived by many as a story-stealer, but a courageous group of caregivers and patients aim to change the view of Alzheimer's disease.
  • Wearing purple, using hashtags and changing your profile picture on social media won't end Alz, but there are other significant ways that you can have a beneficial impact on patients and families who are dealing with dementia.
Related
Questions