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He has a heart condition also.


He keeps getting his meds changed to help cope.


He has passed out three times, so far, this year.


He has nebulisers.


The fluid on his chest is so great that is sometimes comes out from his nose, as well as him mouth.


Does ANYONE have any tips I can pass onto him. He is 79 and lives on his own.


Thank you to anyone that has the time to advise.


Buzzy

Bit of an update.

At the moment he says he is 'fair'.
He now has different tablet regime. So he is working on getting used to them.

He is also waiting for more upcoming appointments.

They are going to train him how to help clear his lungs and chest. So that will ease things for him.

Lots test results to come in yet and cardiac app on monday so will know more then.

I am slowly working on him having help, it took me months to get hubby round and my brother is just as stubborn.
I am also working on him letting me speak to his doctor.

Thank you for you advice.
It is a great comfort.

Buzzy
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The thing is, having slept on it - the state he's in, he's not likely to have the energy to do anything at all except sit still and think "go away and leave me alone." But then he will die.

And your sister's on the scene but has her hands full.

There are two possible targets: 1) his GP and 2) social services.

If you can get the full medical picture from his GP, then you can go on to additional sources such as Marie Curie and Macmillan (who mainly but not exclusively provide cancer services); or you can get ask about local hospice organisations and see what they have to offer; but essentially you can't get very far without the medical history. If your brother hasn't given permission then of course the GP shouldn't speak to you. Innocent expression and whistling... but you can still speak to them...

Social Services you can contact without anyone's permission, explain the situation and say you believe it's a crisis. Teams vary: some are excellent, and have very good working links with the community health teams; and others, not so much. But - why not see?

When you speak to him, the key message is that he can either allow people to intervene now, and have some choice in what happens next; or he can get scraped off the floor by an ambulance crew and have no choice at all about where he gets put. But do keep it really simple, and remember that he just doesn't have the energy to think, let alone do anything much, poor love.
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BuzzyBee Jun 25, 2019
Thank you CM.
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Thank you so much CM :)

I will check out the link you left.
NO one pops in to help him. At the moment he will not let them.
I will try and 'work on him'. It may take a time but I will do it so that he thinks it is his idea. lol
He is so stubborn. Don't know where he gets it from :) He cared for his wife for 9 years (bed ridden) until she passed.

I would feel so much better knowing that he had care of some kind.

Thank you again.
Love Buzzy
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Buzzy have a look at this page:

https://www.berkshirehealthcare.nhs.uk/our-services/older-peoples-healthcare/rapid-assessment-community-clinic/

You need to do a little bit of lateral thinking; but what I'm thinking is that he needs an overhaul of his care plan. He's not going to get that from a GP who's got max. 7 minutes to examine and prescribe; but his GP can refer him to these people, and given his "complex co-morbidities" and level of disability and the fact that he's living alone he might well be a good candidate for a home assessment.

You can't self-refer, it has to come from your GP. So either your brother or your local sister will have to do a lot of sweet-talking; but then again the advantage to the GP is that your poor bro won't be on his list quite so often, plus there'll be an opportunity to "turf" him to acute services.

Are there carers, district nurses or any other services attending his home regularly? There should be.
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You're thinking mesothelioma, are you, Buzzy?

Lives on his own where? - if you'd like to send me a private message I'd be happy to do some digging around.

But I agree that you need to get his permission and get on to his doctor. You can't even begin to know if his treatment could be improved until you know exactly what his medical history is and exactly what they're already doing for him.
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I suggest purchasing a pulse oximeter (the finger clip device used at an ER or MD appt the staff put on a finger) for use at home to assess his oxygen level in %. They cost around $35 - 80+. Normal O2 sats are > 90-100%. Check this randomly & especially when your dad is feeling unwell. It sounds as if he does need a water pill and a check up with the Pulmonologist taking care of your dad.
Make sure when he sleeps his head of bed is elevated so he doesn’t aspirate any fluids into his lungs.
Also try to limit his sodium as salty foods will cause fluid retention. Speak to his doctor but usually a 2 GM (2000 mg/day.

Good luck!
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Have him checked out, from head to toe, blood, etc. How about his body cavity? What does blood test say? Any kind of cancer?
With my dad, liver cancer, kinda spread.... so his chest cavity would fill and suffocate the other organs.

Next step was to be "tapped".. Takes excess fluid out of of chest cavity that surrounds other organs, but then, it fills back up again.............

SO, the more you "tap" the faster you fill....

check for cancer... have him checked to see if he can have excess fluid tapped out before he expels it out of nose etc..

have his blood checked for cancer... sorry for this... I am usually wrong... I hope I am again.
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You’ve said that he has a “chest infection,” but it’s unclear whether you are saying there was a diagnosis by a doctor. If he’s had a diagnosis of a chest infection, then it would mean he’s also been prescribed antibiotics. Make sure he takes them.

But, the fact that you mention his shipyard exposure to asbestos says that you are aware he could have asbestosis, mesothelioma or COPD. The fact that you mention his nebulizers and that he has collapsed 3 times this year indicates the condition that concerns you is not so much a chest infection as it is his limited breathing capacity and probable cough.

A chest x-ray is needed. Has he had one? It’s literally the first thing that needs to happen if he’s aspirating fluid and can’t breathe.

I’m not a medical professional, but I don’t think remedies for a chest infection will be helpful unless that’s actually his problem. People could advise you/him on taking herbal remedies or whatnot, but without clarity on what his condition is, it may be more dangerous passing the tips along than ensuring he get an x-ray.
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I am so sorry Buzzy.  It feels so awful to have no control, when you know something can be done!  (((HUGS)))
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Just thought I had better add.

He worked as a ships carpenter and joiner in a ship building yard, for years and years. He was in contact with asbestos (before anyone knew it was dangerous and than fiberglass. So he is definitely damaged there. He won't fight for compensation either (I already tried to get him too.)
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JoAnn29 Jun 21, 2019
Still a problem.
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Dad had congestive heart failure.  Lungs filled, and hospital withdrew a lot of fluid.  He also had undiagnosed sleep apnea, and other problems.  Can you go with him to doc, or get him to sign a waiver so the doc can talk to you?
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BuzzyBee Jun 21, 2019
Sadly all I can do is 'long distance'.
I have a sister lives closer to him, but he won't listen to her. Besides she is 85 and being cared for by her loved ones (daughter and son-in-law) She has major problems of her own. I know she is worried so I do not tell her all of it, unless it is something we can help with.I will put out a little feeler though about me talking to his doctor. Thank you.
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For right now, while you try to get your brother to a Dr see if you can get him to sleep with his head and chest elevated it doesn't need to be real high, but he should not be sleeping straight on his back either.

I think JoAnn and CW is right!


Just a thought!
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BuzzyBee Jun 21, 2019
Thank you.
I know he sleeps propped up or in a chair - upright (as do I)
All thoughts appreciated.
I will swamp him with suggestions. He will listen eventually, I am sure. The sooner the better.
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Thank you so much.
I will get onto him. He is very stubborn but he sometimes listens to me.
I appreciate any help I can get.
Buzzy
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I agree with JoAnn, that doesn't sound like a lung infection at all (check out pulmonary edema). Poor heart and lung function can really screw with your ability to think - are you sure he is understanding his doctors?
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This sounds like congestive heart failure. He needs a water pill to get rid of the excess water. He may need the water drained from his lungs. This is serious. He could drown in his own fluids. He needs to see a cardiologist.
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