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My aunt is severely obese which is why she can't walk anymore. She has no one to help her at home and is currently being discharged from the hospital and that worries me because she won't be able to do things for herself. I live out of town and she needs help to start walking again.

It's good that you care. However be careful what you may be signing up for! In many states like mine once you assume the "caregiver " role you're locked in for the duration. I got POA and medical proxy for mom (dementia). She lives alone 40 minutes away. It started 10 years ago with managing finances,rides to doctors,filling med dispenser,picking up things at the store. Her care has gotten more needy over the years. 6 months ago it's gotten much worse. She is getting to a point where she should not live alone in an apartment and has no where else to go. Recently she had a situation that she mentally and physically was unable to handle herself with limited help from me. After I had a breakdown, I called Adult Protective Services to tell them she needs to be placed in a home, that I could not provide the care she needs anymore. They told me that as her "Caregiver" I had to make sure she had food,shelter,meds,care and everything else to keep her safe or I could be charged with Neglect of an Elder. That APS can not remove her from her home. She is free to live how and where she wants as long as she can make some kind of rational decision. Even if those decisions are unsound and clouded by Dementia. Now she is starting to self-neglect. She does not want in - home care. Guardianship is very expensive and complex so that's out. Wife doesn't want her moving in with us. Don't know what to do or what's coming. BACK AWAY FOR YOUR OWN GOOD! See ya, gotta go to moms before going to work. It's Exhuasting!
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Reply to gizmo55
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You messaged me that she has edema. From this forum, here is an article about edema:
https://www.agingcare.com/articles/caring-for-a-senior-with-edema-215340.htm

Edema can be a symptom of a bigger problem. If she "needs help walking again"
when she gets home, how are they discharging her if she'll be helpless? If your aunt welcomes your help you will need to start by getting fully informed of her health issues and if she's complying with any medications she's been prescribed. Your aunt needs to take the legal step of making you her durable PoA. You can download the proper forms for her state from sites like Legalzoom.com or Rocketlawyer.com for a minimum fee (like $40) but you will still need to have it witnessed, signed and notarized in her presence. Once it's done, it's done. If she has mental and medical decline it may become too late to create this paperwork.

How far away from her do you live? With a PoA you could tell the hospital hers is an unsafe discharge and they may send her to a rehab facility or to LTC instead. How old is she? What are her financial resources? If she is of meager financial means enough in-home help may not be an option for her. Getting her help will depend on the answers to these questions.
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Reply to Geaton777
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call the local (where she lives) Area Agency on Aging or your State Dept of Aging. They should be able to provide you with resources to help your aunt.
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Reply to sjplegacy
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Why was she in the hospital? How old is she? Does she have any adult children living locally who may have Power of Attorney for her and can advocate for her legally? She is lucky to have you, but to help her she will need to be willing.
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Reply to Geaton777
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Can you speak with the discharge planners at the hospital? If she can't walk and has no help at home, they should be sending her to rehab, not home.
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Reply to BarbBrooklyn
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