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Hi is this another JOY of dementia? my friend called me the other night to tell me he saw my mum walking down the road holding onto the wall he said it was scary how slow she was he didnt realise I was a few hundred yards behind her but still at 75yrs this is not normal is this another sign of dementia?

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Well maybe the doc is right "if its not broken why fix it?" as long as you think he can cope on his own for now.
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I checked out the hearing loss/dementia connection and also looked up difference bewtween AD and Dementia. Uncle seems to be exhibiting some signs of the Lewy Body Dementia, which I never even considerd as he is still mentally competent (in his right mind) as far as taking care of himself in his apartment - just incredibly slow. I found out all the following on lbda.org. Well, he has been sleeping alot more, has trouble sleeping (recurring hallucinations about the same thing), starting to experience urine/bowel control issues (voluntarily wearing Depends in case of accident), walking at a snails pace, seems apathetic at times (starting not to shave for days in a row), depressed attitude 'why bother shaving, I'm not going anywhere', but didn't shave for doctor visit last week, anxiety/agitation/argumentive, and of course the hearing issues. Remarkably his short and long term memory still seem quite good (according to the charts memory impairment is common but not required). So it seems he has a lot of the symptoms, but his doctor has never even mentioned the word. His doctor is very thorough with exams and diagnostics every 6 months, but he does have a pragmatic attitude: the man is 92 years old, he is as good or better physical shape than ordinarily expected for a man of his age (basically I think he believes in letting the person age naturally, and not try to "fix" things unless they are medically threatening). I can't argue with that philosophy, but at least I have a better idea of what I am dealing with and how to handle it.
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My mother walks like a toddler and has moderate dementia.I understand it can be a part of it...
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Thank you Kazza, At 92, I'm surprised that he does not have dementia yet. He does have some problems processing/registering complex information, however. I think that is a factor of his overall intelligence level. I have to restate things in simpler language that he can understand. I think it's a miracle he can take care of himself alone as well as he does (which is why he is fighting the NH option so hard). I am really anxious to find out about his hearing level - whether he needs a hearing aid or just a clean-out to increase his hearing level and his balance issues. We'll find out next week.
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OB just wierd got an email from some health Org and they is now a link between loss of hearing and dementia maybe google it? My mum has gone from not hearing to not registering info thats what i think its like its gone beyond just not hearing?
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Yes Captain this is what confuses me, Ive read that dementia patients shuffle fast? they call it a RAPID SHUFFLE? so does this start slow then increase to a fast shuffle gosh this is so confusing?
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My 92-y/o 'legally blind' uncle had a recent fall and I did not find him until the next morning. Lucid, nothing broken, 1 week in hospital and then home with some home health care. He now uses his cane religiously. However, his gait is slower than a turtle now, and it takes him a long time to do simple things. He seems quite lucid, so I don't think he has dementia. But in the past 2 weeks since he has been home with aides and therapists in & out all day, he seems very grumpy/nasty to me. His hearing seems to have worsened also. Other than that he appears to be quite self-sufficient as long as there is enough medicine/food/meals in the house, and I can leave him alone for a couple of days (which I had to do because I've been sick). Lots of phone calls to keep in touch though. I also just installed the medic alert system and he wears the bracelet. Next week we have an appt with the ear doctor - I'm hoping if he can hear better, his balance will improve also.
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We believe she does realize what is happening. She seems to be trying to fight it, for now anyway.
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dementia patients walk with an ever increasing shuffle. end stage dementia is some terminal s**t . be nice to those people cause they aint going to be around for long.
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Oh and thanks Tova thats exactly how my mum walks and has to hang onto me or a wall even at home ive noticed she falls to the side and grabs the door she WOBBLES I guess so sad to watch and very scary. This really is a horrible disease and just hearbreaking to watch i just wish shed confide in someone even a doc. We had a OT nurse here yesterday and my mum lied the whole time I had to get the nurse on her own and tell her it was all lies and that she cant even walk. Amazing how my mum tried so hard to balance herself when nurse was watching they are great actors and should get an "oscar" for thier performance!!
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Yes tova youre right my mum refuses to see doc "theyre useless" thats all I get. And like your mum she was always keen to go every month and get checked? I think shes in denial and is afraid now of doctors as they will know shes not right. Its just so sad and how scary it must be for them knowing something is wrong and afraid to deal with it. How did your mum react do they even register or just go into denial? I know its dementia and just waiting to have it confirmed makes me so mad that I knew more than her doc and had to fight and now go private to get this investigated a disgrace. Her doc is now being funny with me I guess embarrassed that I didnt go to med school but could tell a huge difference between depression and dementia? Anyway at least am getting this seen to slowly but her geristrician is listening ive been through hell trying to get this sorted have even been called a nutcase by my own family and even kicked out of the house NOW they all feel like crap because I wasnt raving I was right! Thankgod for this forum it just confirms my fears and am now convinced its dementia OR im a chinaman!!
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Kazza- My MIL was diagnosed with midstage dementia several months ago. She now walks at a snails pace, holds onto you and anything else she can - along with her cane. Re your Mom not being interested in walking for her health, last week MIL refused pneumonia vaccine & this was a woman who for as long as I've known her (35 yrs) would go to doc/specialists for a sniffle & never miss a vaccine.
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She hasnt been diagnosed yet but im guessing vascular dementia as she has diabetes and its badly controlled. Shes never one to have excercised or go for a walk her heart will give out one day and soon if she dosnt get moving. Im done trying to get her out she dosnt want to and dosnt care when i say you may have a heart attack if you dont get some oxigen she says "so what maybe id be better off dead" she dosnt care dont know if this is a part of dementia or the deression that comes with it. So difficult to try and care for someone who couldnt careless if they live or die?
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Do you have a diagnosis for a specific kind of dementia, kazzaa? Strong loss of depth perception is an early (and continuing) feature of some dementias. The door threshold between two rooms may appear to be a huge step, or appear to be knee high. Pebbles on a walkway may appear to be boulders. If the walls and the floor are a similar color it may be hard to judge how wide the hall is. All of these things can be frightening, and would naturally make someone want to go very slowly. It might also make someone fear going for walks.

Extremely poor depth perception is only one of many reasons a person with dementia may slow down, and it is more prevalent in certain types of dementias than in others. But it is probably worth being aware of.

If the slowness is related to dementia, then age has nothing to do with it. It could hit at 55 or 75 or not hit until 90. Dementia changes the normal aging progression.

JessieBelle's approach -- to allow extra time, and to accept the slowness -- seems the most kind and also most practical, to me.

I recall one morning when we were running late I was trying to reassure my husband. 'It's OK honey. If we don't dawdle we will make it on time." He gave a pitiful groan. "But all I know how to do is dawdle!" Poor guy. He recognized how slow he was. I didn't usually do for him things he could do for himself, but in those tense situations I'd say, "Just because we have a deadline today, how about if I help you put your shirt on?"
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JB dont know how old your mum is but i dont consider 75 old my mum takes baby steps almost waddles than walking? scary stuff BUT having said that she had five kids and NEVER looked after her weight or EVER excercised so I guess this is the outcome. They say now they can perdict if someone will get dementia by how slow they walk!
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Just thought about one thing that bothers me some. Quite often nice people hold the door for my mother. She will be 20-30 feet away and they are holding the door open. I smile and tell them she'll be there in a minute. One thing I've learned is that people who hold the door for old people have a lot of patience. What nice people.
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My mother has been walking slower and slower. I time things now to give her five minutes to get to the car. I think it is a combination of things for her -- mobility problems, vision loss, age, and loss of timing that comes with dementia. It is hard for me to walk so slow. I find she does move faster if I walk in front of her. However, if I walk directly in front of her, she stops because she feels she is going to walk in to me. She can't judge the distance between herself and me. I walk a bit off to the side.

I've seen shows on TV that poke fun of old people moving slowly. I don't like shows that poke fun. It does let us know, though, that it isn't unusual for old people to slow down... a lot.
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Hi have just googled this and walking slow is an early sign of dementia! It means the brain is slowing down. my mum is only 75 ive seen 90 yr olds walk much faster its awful im quite tall and walk fast and finding it harder and harder to go out with her as I just cant slow down that much and end up walking ahead of her will discuss with doc also she does no excercise at all wont even go out for a 10 minute walk next thing is her heart will give up she is so stubborn and will not listen WHY? she just dosnt care.
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Is it lack of strength, or problems with balance? A walker or cane might help. Get her evaluated by a PT, maybe.
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I hope this isn't out in left field

Our doctors recently suggested that E be tested for something called, "normal pressure hydrocephalus." Google it. It's kinda complicated, but if her other symptoms match those that predict this condition, it might be worth having the doctors test for it.
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