Moving mom home. Any advice? - AgingCare.com

Moving mom home. Any advice?

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Thank you for those who made suggestions on my other thread. Wanted to put this out there to all -- what things should I do to get ready to bring my Mom home (either hers, or mine)? She's more chair than walker right now. Nothing is senior-proof. I can think of: 1. temporary ramp, 2. HCH aide, all day, 3. bathroom stuff (raised toilet), grab bars, shower seat), 4. grab bars for other parts of house. Is there anything else?

She has Medicare and BCBS -- will those pay for PT and a VN, or anything else?

Thanks for any thoughts!

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Lots of good lighting. Baby proof with corner guards on furniture and tables. Protective pads for some furniture and beds. Lock up or move cleaning solutions or other hazardous chemicals she might confuse.

Label light switches, remote, TV on off etc to make her life easier.

Turn down hot water heater to prevent scalding.
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Get help from day one.
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Take up the oriental rugs! Remove stuff in the bathroom that can get splashed with bodily fluids.

Good luck.
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Instead of the simple elevated toilet seat, I would get a toilet safety frame with elevated seat. Some of the simple elevated toilet seats slip, even if they are clamped in place. The frames set over the toilet like a potty -- four legs on the floor. The type that has a funnel with splash guard work best, IMO. They are very stable for elderly people.
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The discharge planner should be talking to you about visiting nurses, PT, OT and VNA will do an in-home evaluation. Services have to be ordered by the MD, so cover all the bases.
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A side rail for the bed. If you don't have a hospital bed you can push one side against the wall and get a rail that slips under the mattress on the other side.
A means of summoning help, like a wireless door bell, whistle or baby monitor.
Drinking vessels that are light enough for her to handle. if she eats really slowly a heated plate so her food does not get too cold to be appetizing. Toilet paper that is easy for her to reach. I sure there are lots of other things.
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Over-chair table, so that she doesn't have to lean over to reach things. You can get height-adjustable ones. I'm afraid they're all ugly, and some of them are expensive too.

Safety-proofing tip: walk your mother's routes around the house, acting wobbly as if you might fall at any time. That way you'll catch sight of trip hazards, slippery rugs and rug edges, furniture that proves too flimsy to lean on, sharp corners, flexes, light switches out of safe reach - all the things that otherwise are only obvious once the damage is done..! For installing the grab handles and things, again pretend you're her height, with her reach and her grip; then you'll see where they need to be for her to reach and hold them naturally.

You can extend this to acting out other routines, too; showering, washing, taking her meals and so on.

If the chair will be a feature for long, clear things you don't need for the duration right out of the way - box them up, put them in the spare room, garage, anywhere. It'll save hours of fiddling about moving stuff when you're trying to manoeuvre the chair at the same time.

Can you check the policy covers online?

It's great you're doing this in advance - it'll save so much trial and error. Wish her welcome home. x
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