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She has dementia. My mom's first language is Serbian....and when she gets upset, she communicates in that language, even though she knows english. Finding caregivers that know the language is next to impossible. I'm worried that at some point she needs even more care and attention, and I will have to quit working all together. Money is tight for both of us...and I'm terrified I will have nothing saved for my own retirement. So overwehlmed... I guess I'm looking for any kind of advice. Running out of options.

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Hopper -- I understand the fear you have. I have nothing and trying to get ft work and it so hard after 50. Plus I have had to leave work when she falls or has heart issues strokes - which is par the course - but it also impacts a career if I can ever land one at my old age.. Employers have not been very impressed to learn I am caregiving 2 elderly parents. But then they are all younger than I and have no idea what lay ahead should they be in a similar situation.
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Thank you for responding. Great ideas .....I have contacted our church, but not any other churches. I'll just keep looking....might get lucky with someone, if not, will have to go with a good caregiver regardless of language and just trust the process. Thank you again.
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When it comes to Alzheimer's/Dementia [as per your profile] it is probably a lot easier for your Mom to use her native tongue.

I don't think you really need to find a caregiver who speaks the language as many caregivers take care of people who have lost their hearing due to age, thus they are able to communication through some type of sign language. And as the memory loss advances, it is hard to understand the patient even when they are speaking English.

Of course your Mom might enjoy having around who speaks Serbian. Does your Mom understand Bosnian, Croatian, or Montenegrin? Or Russian, Belorussian, Ukrainian? What about German? Some dialects cross over each other. If you live in a big metro area, there would be churches that off services in these dialects, thus maybe you could find a caregiver who speaks the language.
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