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How to make the bathroom a safe place and tub accessible for hygiene. Where to go for stair/chair lift. Where to go for ramp/s & railing. I have spent all the money I had refurbishing the basement but now need to address these other needs but have run out of immediate funds. -- Need recommendations.

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bbender, switching out the bathtub for a walk-in shower is an excellent idea. And put in a portable bath chair.

My Dad's caregiver recommended a bath chair and once Dad started to use it he wanted more showers :) Dad also had the metal hand rails on the shower walls, even on the wall in front of the toilet and metal hand rails to the side of the toilet if there is a wall. A plumber or a trusted handyman can install those as they need to go into the stud. Do not get those suction cup type grab rails.
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It might be helpful to have an occupational therapist walk through the house to give you some ideas on what might work best for your specific lay out and needs. When it comes to getting into the tub.. when I moved in to help my mom she was no longer able to hide the fact that she hadn't been getting in the tub to shower or bathe but had been relying on sponge baths, even though we had sturdy grab bars.
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Although my mother is safer in the basement, I would like her to have full access to the entire house and all the entrances and exits - which would be adding a chair lift and a ramp from the garage to the house.

My first need is how to make the bathroom with a tub accessible -- there are so many products available that I'm not sure what the best option is - i.e. clamp on handles for the tub; wall mounted bars; a floor to ceiling pole; build step/s; a transfer bench, etc. she is fairly stable when standing she just cannot lift her legs up high enough to get into the tub and that is when she is more vulnerable to falling. I plan on changing out the tub and installing a shower, but that won't be for several months so I'm trying to figure out the best course of action for now.
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Look at the Salvation Army for those medical equipment supplies you need. I recently spent time researching where to donate new and nearly new equipment that my Dad had.

The local council in aging sent me to the Salvation Army. They have a good amount that is really cheap. All cleaned and ready to go. They require a recommendation from one of the churches or council to make this available to get....so, generally you cannot just walk in and buy. Also, if you are low income..you can get it at no cost from them.

Also..check with catholic charities... I donated all the cases of ensure, cases of men's depends, and chucks to them. They get this sort of supply for low income seniors.
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You mentioned ramps, I'm not sure why if the apartment is full walk out with no steps? (Sounds lovely BTW). Maybe if you gave us a list of the specific things you are looking for you would get better answers, but
I don't think there is any way to cheap out on ramps but I think a custom made wood ramp will probably be cheaper than any aluminum pre made one, unless you are just looking at very low thresh hold ramps.
I have found that I would have been better off spending the extra $$ on equipment that will last for the long term as my mom's health needs have increased, for example we started with a simple shower chair, then needed a new one with a back, then needed one with arms and a cut out to help with peri care.
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Thank you all for sharing inform information on where to find contractors and products. For those of you that are concerned about safety of the basement it is a full walkout with no steps easier for her to get in and out of the house it has a full bath 2 bedrooms fireplace wet bar 7 Windows and is over 1200 square feet. She is actually safer in the basement then in the main house as there are no stairs and she canbget in and out when she wants to or needs to again thank you all
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There is an exception to the window requirement for a basement sleeping area in Colorado - and that is a second door leading out. For instance- in my home you can access the basement from a staircase from the main floor or through a door that leads in/out of the garage. Just thought I'd throw that out there...which of course, doesn't address the OPs question. Sorry. For your question - check with your county agency for Aged and Disabilities, sometimes grants are available for home improvements in order to facilitate keeping people out of facilities and in their homes.
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bbender, if someone is going to be sleeping in the basement, the bedroom must have a window that is large enough so that a fireman wearing an oxygen tank can easily get through the window... otherwise the bedroom would be not to code, or illegal, and maybe un-insurable. Better to be safe.

Also, if you haven't already, have the basement area tested for radon gas, which can come up through the flooring in the basement. Not every home has this, some have mild readings, but if the reading is above acceptable levels then you would need to have a company come in to put an exhaust to remove as much radon to make it acceptable.

Here's another idea, is there a bedroom on the main floor of your house? Give that to Mom to use... or create a bedroom, such as removing the dining room furniture and make that a bedroom. That might work if there is a powder room or full bath on the main floor. If your bedroom/bath is on the main floor, it would make more sense and less expensive to switch, having Mom in your bedroom and you in the lower level. Just a thought.

Oh, is your Mom going to help pay for those items that she needs for the house? See if she is willing to pay for the extras, like the stair lift, or walk-in bathtub. As it sounds like you have used up all your money to redo the basement. What if there is a major repair that needs to be done?
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In a basement, in Winter, in Colorado is illegal at best. Now get mom to Assisted Living.
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You have a lot on your plate, and a lot of adaptions to make.

First, hire a carpenter to put grab bars on the walls around the bathtub. Don't hire someone who just puts them in anywhere; they have to be anchored in the studs. Add them along the wall adjacent to the toilet, and anywhere that would be necessary for safe movement.

Also consider getting a slide over chair which extends outside the tub so your mother doesn't have to lift her legs to get in. That's an easy way to lose balance and fall.

I would think seriously about using a tub, though, if her disabilities are physical.

Second, stair/chair lifts are expensive to install and require contractors skilled in installation. The DIY TV series once featured a corrective project by one of their tv star contractors, Holmes, to correct an incomplete, slightly botched stair lift installation. As I recall, it wasn't an easy correction; these are complex installations.

And they're expensive. With limited funds, this might be a challenge.

Third. I'm concerned though if you're planning to have your mother live in the basement. There are some code issues there if she's going to live in the basement. Perhaps you've already addressed these in the remodel?

It's my understanding that if someone is living in a basement, there has to be egress capability, which would likely mean a door rather than window egress. And given that she's older and apparently needs some adaptive devices, you probably would have to consider safe exit with a rail support, and transit from the basement to a sidewalk or driveway.

Fourth, do some research or contact the AAA to get names of companies that provide ramp and railing retrofits. Make sure the contractor is familiar with the specific slope requirements so the retrofits are compliant with local building/code requirements.

From the AAA Caregiver Expos, I've collected brochures on local companies that do this kind of retrofitting. They would be the only ones I would consider when I have to get this done for my father.

Do you have an attached garage? If so, the ramp would exit directly into the garage, which would be much safer in the Colorado winters. If you don't have an attached garage, think about what kind of weather protection you'll need to protect your mother and you as you're transiting down the ramp, which could be quite slippery in those rough winters you have in Colorado. I would also give some consideration to overhead protection so you're not snowed or rain on as you exit.

You face quite an ambitious and costly set of adaptations. I wish you luck. I don't think you could get free assistance given that you've apparently had the money to retrofit the basement. Perhaps you could consider a HELOC to finance the additional changes needed.
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