Can I move my mother from one nursing home to another? Or can I move her to a rehab center?

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My mother was put in a nursing home rehab to get her back on her feet after a week long hospital stay. The nursing home claimed she had a foot infection and was unable to take the therapy treatment for which she went in. After 5 months she became a permanent patient. I would like to put her in another nursing home rehab program that will help her walk again since she no longer is diagnoise with the foot infection. She is a Medicaid patient. Her health has gotten worse since going into the nursing home but she is still able to walk if therapy is giving to her. The nursing home states they do not have enough staff to assist her in walking. Please advice in where I could put her.
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You could contact the long-term care ombudsman for the Zip code of this nursing home and see if he or she can help you decide your next step. This person will know your state laws on Medicaid and the ins and outs of the system in your locale. If you to to www.ltcombudsman.org, you can type in the Zip code and that will take you to your contact. The ombudsman is your representative when dealing with ltc. Good luck,
Carol
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After a stroke and hospital stay, my son was placed into a rehab center without consulting me. Hopefully,we shall move back north to be where all my family reside. I shall need to get a dismissal from the rehab center. Another son is working with social worker up north. Will I require an atty. for a smooth transfer? As an elderly person my plans were to move back home at this time but getting approval to move my son with me is causing me concern. lI cannot leave him behind,Bess Please advise.
Bess
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Deet, make sure the rehab team knows that this is the goal, and that you are beign realistic about it (it is medically feasible for him to handle the transportation, etc.) and make sure that your son can get the therapy he needs to make progress in the new setting. The rehab staff, if they care about your son, will be heistant to send him away to where they do not think he will do as well, but they might be able to help make sure that services will be available and get you properly connected and referred so neither you nor the new therapy providers will have to start from scratch.

That said, you do typically have the right to request discharge and insist on it as long as basic health care and specific care needs your son may have are covered. For example, if he has a trach or feeding tube family may be required to show that they can take care of them. You should not need an attorney and you should be participating in planning conferences with the rehab team. You should be able to negotiate a mutuallly agreeable discharge date and make plans around that. UNLESS the rehab facility is unethical and just determined to milk every dollar out of his insurers and then dump him wherever when the money runs out - I hope you are not dealing with that kind of facility. I once helped put a company like that out of business and would like to think there are not that many genuinely bad places left out there. If your some is making good progress and you have good access to the staff and speak regularly with the social worker and/or d/c planner and physician, it is most likely not a bad facility. Let us know what you reallly suspect after thinking about it some more - maybe we can help either way.
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