My mother with Alzheimer's says she is in pain a lot. The hospital found nothing. Does anyone have advice? - AgingCare.com

My mother with Alzheimer's says she is in pain a lot. The hospital found nothing. Does anyone have advice?

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My mom use to be a very strong person. She raised me that if I was sick to get up and go and I would feel better, I have never heard her complain about much but lately she tells me that she is in a lot of pain. She can't really tell me where and its so frustrating. I certainly do not want to see her hurting. Sometimes I can just try to move her, she had pretty much stopped walking and she will yell out like I'm hurting her by just touching her. This is very concerning. I have had her at the hospital twice and they have not found anything wrong with her. Someone told me that when you have Alzheimer's that you pain in amplified greatly. Does anyone have any advice or know anything about this. It is so upsetting to see my mom this way.

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My LO, who has dementia, has fluctuating pain. She may complain of it, but, later at the ER deny she hurts and seems fine. I wonder if it's muscle cramps. They can hurt pretty bad, but, come and go on their own. The MC works on keeping her hydrated and she gets some exercise propelling herself around in her wheelchair.

Also, arthritis can hurt too. And then depression can cause one to feel pain throughout their body. I'd try to work out some pain treatment, if she's complaining. I'd try to work on hopefully, keeping her comfortable.

Is she in a wheelchair? Sometimes, sitting in one position can cause pain. There are special seat cushions that fit in the chair that combat soreness. Also, check her mattress to see if it's too soft or too hard. Is she allergic to fabric softener, chaffing from undergarment, etc. I might go in her room and just examine anything that touches her to see if there is something hard, rough, etc. Even check her shoes for pressure points. Her report of pain may be on the wrong part of the body.

Teepa Snow on you tube has some good pointers on finding pain location in dementia patients. You might check that out.
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Does giving her, say Tylenol, give her any relief?

Is her doctor a geriatrician?
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That is what I though. I know Mom never use to complain, so I really don't know if its the disease or what. BUT I did ask them, I understand people get hooked on pain meds but at this point I have requested that they just give them to her. I hate to see her crying out and not being able to tell me what is wrong, Its like you said she one minute will say her stomach, the she will say she is OK, they it will be another area. I just don't feel its wrong to give her pain meds at this point but I can't seem to get the Doctor to agree with me. It is very upsetting. Mom is so small, I'm guessing at this point she only ways about 75 pounds, she has always been small so I agree I think its her spine or bones that she is having issues with.
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Dementia patients (like my mom) are notoriously bad at localizing pain. Even when staff asks mom if she's in pain (like if she's weeping or wringing her hands) she shakes her head "no".

This was SO frustrating! I finally had them put mom on scheduled pain relief, assuming that when you are 94, have osteoarthritis, compression fractures in your spine and can't talk because of a stroke, it's better to be out of pain that in it.
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My mother-in-law would be in pain and could not explain where the pain was or what type of pain. She would point to her stomach when it turned out to be her kidneys. I feel for you, this is very upsetting to deal with. Talk to the doctor. True, it could be back pain from being in the bed for long periods of time, it could be sciatica or pinched nerve. Unfortunately there are several problems that won't show up on a test. At that point it becomes a trial and error process to find answers. On another point does she have a medical power of attorney? I would talk to the Doctor about a pain medication to help her in general. As in "keeping her comfortable".
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Aveeno, I remember back when my Mom could no longer walk, thus she either stayed in bed or was placed in a geri-recliner.... thus her back would be hurting all the time from the lack of use. It could be sore muscles or a pinched nerve which may or may not show up on an x-ray, etc.

Your Mom probably starts to hurt more before you even touch her, as your Mom is anticipating the pain that will follow. Can you Mom take over-the-counter pain medicine? If yes, check with her doctor to see which one would be the best.
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