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She believes everyone having a conversation are talking about her, becomes defensive and/or upset. She thinks people are taking all of her things, clothes to toothbrush. She is constantly moving and hiding her things in her bedroom, and then believes they have been stolen. She will talk about leaving to find a policeman. This is happening everyday and is exhausting! Any helpful ideas please?

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Thank you for your answers! The dr started mom on seroquel, it has been 3 nights and i know it's early yet and I don't want to jinx it, but we have been sleeping!! Yay!! I was more exhausted than when I had newborns! The hallucinations have also calmed down. Keeping my fingers crossed that this was the magic bullet.
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Wish I could correct my posts...I wanted to say meds and dosages above, not diseases. Sorry...silly auto correct! 🙃
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The two medications my husband is on are Seroquel and Alprazolam (Xanax). The Seroquel is for the paranoia and that has been increased and seems to be at a better level now with somewhat less paranoia. The other med is for the anxiety and just helps with the level of fearfulness and worrisome thoughts.
However, they do need to adjust them formthenperson because my husband got them too close together once while still at home and he couldn't talk, barely walk and was crawling around looking for something. This lasted for 7 miserable hours!
Be sure to ask about the meds because I was the one who had to say if the current meds and diseases were working or not.
We tried two other meds before we got this workable combination.
Best of luck to you.
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4forme, I wonder if her medications need adjusting. Sometimes they have to try a few to find the fight combination and dose. If your mom is suffering with anxiety due to her delusions, I'd push for the doctor to re-evaluate her medications.

I suppose that there are some cases where the anxiety or delusion cannot be addressed, but from what I have seen most can be. I would also add that often these types of behavior occur in stages and the patient often doesn't continue with it indefinitely. So, that should bring some hope.
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I had to empty my husbands closet and drawers. I kept things in another part of the house and when he said everything had been stolen, I assured him that I had everything and I'd give it to him when he was ready to get dressed. That seemed to satisfy him and he wasn't always hiding his stuff or trying to put them on top the car so we could run for it "if those killers got in!"
It made life a bit easier for me...however, it didn't stop the things in the kitchen from being taken to other parts of the house. I never did find a way to stop that.
My husband is now in a memory care facility, on just two medications and he seems a lot less paranoid and distracted with all the other peoples activity around him. He's only been there two weeks today but things are working out.
You may need to get her some antipsychotic medication or increase her dosage if she's already on it.
Best of luck to you.
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She goes to the dr. for regular check ups (every 4 months), and is on medications. From everything I have looked at it seems to be a common occurrence for alzheimer's. It is frustrating and exhausting but also breaks my heart that she has to go through this. I was hoping others going through it would have some tips on making it easier.
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That's a great link that freqflyer provided. I think it's important to get a proper diagnosis from the doctors as to what is causing it and then determine a treatment plan. Often medication can help. I'd do that immediately as that kind of mental anguish sounds very frightening to her.
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I'm starting to find that happening more and more often in my mother's case too. Misplaced items are thought to be items of theft, when eventually you find them in unlikely places. I would try to talk her down, saying, it's around here somewhere and help her look... Eventually I find it... as well as a banana in her underwear drawer and boxed up lunch in her closet. Ugh.
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I found this very good article here on Aging Care that I hope will be helpful. https://www.agingcare.com/articles/hallucinations-delusions-and-paranoia-151513.htm which had over 50 comments.
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