Narcissistic mother revoked my power of attorney. Her prescription bill is still coming to my address she refuses to change it to her address. - AgingCare.com

Narcissistic mother revoked my power of attorney. Her prescription bill is still coming to my address she refuses to change it to her address.

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My 82 yr old Mother has always been narcissistic and tore down my self esteem in my child and adulthood. (I am the oldest daughter, age 62). She appointed me her POA in Nov 2014 as she was going to nursing home in Dec 2014. I had a terrible financial mess to clean up of hers while POA, $12,000 worth of delinquent credit card bills, etc. . She and my stepdad got divorced because she was going on Title 19, if they remained married he would lose his farm to pay for nursing home. Mom and I got into an argument in Nov 2015. A few weeks later I received notice from the attorney that she revoked the POA (because I pissed her off). That was fine the POA was revoked, she was making my life a living hell anyway. However since I had no prior notice of the POA revocation, I was not able to call her prescription company to change the billing from my address to hers. Her EX-husband now takes care of paying her bills. (He visits her every day and they act like they are still married) I have asked them via postal mail the last 4 months to change the address so I don't have to forward it to them each month. (we do not speak on the phone, mom, me and stepdad have not spoken since Nov 2015) Knowing my mother this is being done on purpose to tick me off to forward the bill each month. Am I obligated to forward this bill to her each month? I am ready to just forget it and if they get behind on the bill, oh well their problem not mine. I did not know if there is a legal obligation involved? Thanks in advance for your replies.

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You might also want to consider publishing a notice in a local legal or classified section of a public newspaper to the effect that you are not responsible for any debts, obligations, etc. not incurred by you.
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Send the certified or registered letter to the attorney who drafted the revocation advising him that you no longer should be receiving mail for your mother and ask him to take care of the issue.

I'm not sure that would be considered "conducting business" for your mother - it's also conducting a financial safety issue for you, and you have the right to do that.
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So don;t conduct business.. just write "No longer lives here" on the envelope and put it back in the mailbox. notify the post office she no longer lives with you, and not to deliver her mail. Bad on them if they did not give PO forwarding address. This way you are not doing business in her name, or lying... But don;t open the mail!!
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cwillie, I re-read your comment I see what you mean, send a copy of my letter via registered mail. Great idea, thanks !!
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Thanks for the comments, here is the problem, the POA revocation strictly states under no circumstances am I allowed to conduct ANY business concerning my mother. Therefore I cannot contact the company. I have sent a letter to my mom at the nursing home AND to my stepdad's home address with the co. phone number highlighted in yellow marker and said "have mom call them to change the address".....I have done this the past 4 months. I am sure both of them are NOT doing the address change out of spite. GRRRRR There is no new POA, this is not a POA at all now. My mother does not think ahead or of future consequences of her actions, when she is ticked off she does things without thinking first. My stepdad is no help, he started this family feud in Jan 2015 and things went downhill from there. He is 84 yrs old, I don't know who she thinks will take care of her affairs if he dies first, but again she does not think ahead.
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Bet, you can bet!
You might want to send a copy to your mother and her new poa as well, that way your a** is covered, nobody can accuse you of not informing them if they have signed for the letter.
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Draft a letter to the pharmacy telling them you are no longer responsible and that any future bills sent to you will be unpaid. Send it registered mail. You can be that they will be on the phone to your mother to figure it out.
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