My Father has dementia and Parkinson's, and my Mother is overwhelmed with decisions regarding finances and the life changes she is facing. Any advice?

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Has there been a good book or guide written, or is there a one-stop agency that can help her step-by-step with all of the decisions and details she is facing?

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How old is your mom? Is she possibly overwhelmed because she's facing some cognitive loss as well? Just something to consider.

Make sure that your mom is keeping up with eating good food, getting enough sleep and getting out on her own. Make sure she's going to HER doctor's appointments and that her pcp knows what's going on with your dad.
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You question is very broad. There is no one step manual for what your Mom is getting into. This site is a great place to get answers to more specific questions about any thing medical, financial insurace etc.

If she has not done so, and Dad is still competent and cooperative one of the first priorities is to get the legal and finances prepared. She may need to get power of attorney to handle all his affairs when he is no longer able. Wills, end of life directives should be done.

Depending on her age and health it's quite likely she is going to need help at home soon and should begin looking into appropriate care facilities as things progress. I m sure you will get much good advice on this site. More I fo and more specific questions would be helpful.
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I am not aware of one particular book for caregivers, but I would imagine there are some out there. There is good information on this site and other places like the Alzheimers website.

Is your mom able to be your dad's Power of Attorney? Would it be more practical for you or another sibling to do it? Has your dad signed the POA? I would get that done quickly while he is still competent.

I might start with a comprehensive consult with an Elder Law attorney to review their situation and exercise asset protection if applicable.

There is a lot available about dementia and it would help, IMO, to learn how the illness progresses so you know what to expect.

It's smart to learn as much as possible upfront so you aren't caught off guard.
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