My mother (95) lives in a CCRC and is not accepted into the assisted living portion due to delusional disorder. Now what? - AgingCare.com

My mother (95) lives in a CCRC and is not accepted into the assisted living portion due to delusional disorder. Now what?

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My mother has lived in independent living at this continuing care retirement communities (CCRC) for 12 years and now needs assistance physically.

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Merrytaylor,
You can trust the advice above, imo. Lawyer, I agree.

If you can, please update us on your Mom's progress.

Keep coming back.

Prayers for you and your Mom.
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If CWillie's suggestion could resolve the situation, that's the way to go.

But if your moms CCRC is fixed in their opinion that they cannot ever provide the level of care needed for mom AND mom did a hefty $$$ buy-in a dz years ago AND you are thinking mom is due $ back.... you need to ASAP locate moms CCRC contract & any annual residential agreement and get with a NAELA certified elder law atty.
"Buy In" CCRC contracts tend to be very restrictive as to what can & will be provided for higher level of care and if care could be done at the CCRC there can be substantial daily add-ons for care to be done. IMO the CCRC model for profitability is to have majority residents who are in a patio apt with kitchen or IL unit with a general cafeteria; with the rest in AL or NH whose residents need custodial care or medication management but nothing above that as its too costly.

12years ago is a long time. Agreement may have been made back in 2004 when mom was 83 that if mom did a buy in, that she was good there till forever. You need an atty to review all paperwork.

Also if mom did her CCRC so that she has a apt or patio home..... she doesn't own it. CCRC is in control of unit and when to be released from moms contract and placed back on market for another "buyer" who meets the entry fee & any other restrictions this CCRC places. If mom could be seeing $ from the unit, your atty is going to need to light a fire under the CCRC to get all this done sooner than later.

My experience with CCRC is from being executrix to an aunt. She bought into a CCRC - expensive six figures too- lovely patio "home". Within first few weeks had a fall/TIA, went to hospital, stroked and died. They foot dragged on putting unit onto market but still charging a monthly assessment. FUN! Probate atty had to file suit with a long discovery list to get anywhere. Contract very one sided. If your moms is at all like my aunts was, your going to need an atty.

If mom is now without $ but only her monthly SS & retirement income and looking like she's going to be applying for Medicaid to go into a NH (as the CCRC won't accept her back ever), ask the atty how to deal with any remaining interest/$ at the CCRC that could be considered an asset for Medicaid. You don't want mom to get screwed twice in all this. Good luck.
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Better go back to the continuing care contract she signed and look at the exclusions. It may be that you could perhaps get some kind of rebate for her.

So she's now back in her apartment: what next step is anyone suggesting?
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If she is refusing to take medication then she will continue to exhibit the behaviour that has gotten her disqualified, I don't see any way around this other than continuing to work toward getting her appropriately treated.
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Thanks very much! She actually was very recently evaluated and treated as an inpatient in the hospital psychiatric floor due to acute paranoia (she wouldn't go back into her apartment for fear of being poisoned.) She was in the hospital for 2.5 weeks. She refused anti-psychotic meds ie, zyprexa. The hospital recommendation was AL due to fall risk and uncontrolled diabetes. She is now on med management and with a walker back in her apartment. CCRC says that they are not equipped to handle mental illness other than memory care. She paid a large sum 12 years ago to take advantage of a continuum of care but, is now being denied it.
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Get her evaluated and treated by a geriatric psychiatrist. Once she is properly diagnosed and stabilized she may meet the criteria for the AL.
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