My Mother is hospitalized for c diff. stage 6 Alzheimer's, but now has lost the ability to swallow. What's next?

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Can't swallow without choking so food and water have been stopped. Is getting IV for fluid and antibiotic.

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Thank you so much for your condolences and thoughtful words. I have many wonderful memories right up till the end. She was a soft spoken and kind person who set an example of strength for her family. I am at peace knowing I did my best and was there for her in her time of need. It is hard to let go but with time I will be fine. Richer for this difficult experience, and stronger I hope.
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Kadacough, I'm so sorry to learn of your loss but hope that the time you spent with your mother was beneficial to you both, and that you have good memories of her to last your own lifetime. And remember always that your respect for her wishes was perhaps the greatest thing you could ever do for her.
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Thank you sooz55. My mothers health directive specified no tube feeding with a terminal illness. I felt I respected her wishes by saying no to that. She passed away after 10 days on hospice. At age 92 and after 11 years of struggling with Alzheimer's I feel I made the right choice on her behalf. Miss her a lot.
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...sorry, I meant the IV and putting food in through her nose.
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When my mom couldn't swallow her Living Will/Health Directive said she did not want any treatment that would keep her alive when her body would no longer perform. The Alzheimer's began around 2009. She died here at home in 2015 and we went through all 7 stages of this monster disease we call Alzheimer's. When she could no longer swallow even a straw full of water that I would place in her mouth, she was gone in about a day. I think your mom is in stage 7, not 6. She will wither away slowly before she goes if you keep her on those machines. Talk about harm and a cruel way to go... geez. This is not living and she is not going to get better. I'm very sorry to say this but please try to remember what "quality of life" means. Do what you think is best for her comfort. Very very tough decision for you to make and I really send you my understanding cause I've been through it. Big hug to you.
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Its now a month past this critical time for your mum. I hope she has survived , although she cant do so on IV fluids and antibiotics alone.
She needs food, and that should have been given to her . Dr should have put in a nasal tube and be FEEDING HER .
The doctor’s oath is CAUSE no HARM, and he is causing harm . He is letting her die. Regards , Mel
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Thank you all for the concerned comments and ideas. I will meet with the palliative care nurse at the hospital tomorrow am. I think we are at that point to make her as comfortable as possible.
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My heart goes out to you Kadacough, Hospice is a tough road, been there, but it's better than doing nothing and just waiting for a miracle recovery.
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Definitely check into hospice. Has she indicated to you in the past about the kind of care she wants if she becomes unable to speak? If not you have to look at what medical care is available and what care is appropriate for her. I've seen dementia/decline to happen rapidly before and feel dementia is a terrible disease that robs us of our loved ones twice; one when their mind goes and again when the body dies. For my grandma who had dementia, we decided not to insert a feeding tube. Measures were in place to keep her as comfortable as possible and that included oxygen and pain meds. Quality of life is a big indicator for me. Does this person have quality? Will things ever improve so they will have a higher quality of life? Hospice staff are so good at what they do, spend time with your mom and keep your memories alive. She may not be able to converse, but you can talk to her about those memories. I'm sorry about your mom, I know about being a caregiver to someone who has dementia and know it's sad to see them slowly slip away.
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Thank you Maggie- it's come on so suddenly I'm shocked. But there seems nothing can be done at this point. I need to accept it. And I will look into Hospice options.
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