MIL wants to try new vitamins/medicines all the time. What can I do?

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MIL watches TV all day and sees commercials for wellness drinks, pills, etc. and wants to try all of these expensive things. I fell for it once and let her buy Nopolea for $150 a month - what a rip off. She is obsessed with drinks, vitamins, etc. She had a stroke 14 years ago and is paralyzed on one side and in a wheelchair unable to walk at all (she lives with us). Other than this, she is extremely healthy and only takes an antidepressant and an anti seizure med due to her stroke. She's always writing phone numbers down and telling us to call or ripping things out from newspapers and magazines to call and order for her. When we tell her no and ask her if she is not feeling well then we'll take her to the dr. she cries like a child. This is driving me crazy.

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1DIL, I feel for you. My mother had an entire cupboard full of miracle cleaning products. She bought them in the subconscious belief that they would actually do the cleaning so she didn't have to. "Bang! - and the dirt is gone." Yeah right.
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If she's really into her TV, go the expense of a 'smart' TV, pay for a few of the online services like Netflix (where you can get just about any of your favorite TV shows and thousands of movies for under $10 a month) ... all you need then is internet, and can utterly avoid cable or commercial television.

If she tends to not remember that she's/you've ordered something, you could always fake it. Get out the order form, write the check and mail it back to yourself (or toss it, lol). Invoke the 'kind lie' and remind her, if she asks that shipping can take up to 8 weeks. Bet she's utterly forgotten about it by then.
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Does she remember that she ordered things? It could be part of dementia. My dad did not buy things, but made multiple copies of some of his WW II memorabilia. I think he would get stuck on something "important" but couldn't remember making copies. There is not real easy solution to this, try distratction to get her mind off buying things, record tv shows and cut out the commercials, find movies she likes so she doesn't see commerials, block cable channels.....just thoughts
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Get her involved in an adult day care, or have someone come over and play board games with her, scrabble. Go to the library, and get her large print books to read, and then return them. Books on tape. Other things to do but tv. If she is concerned about health, Try GNC, TRADER JOES, The 99 cent store may have health things that are about ready to expire...but are still good. Your local health store. Make an adventure one day, and take her out. Yeah, easier said than done. I know...Go to library and find a health book, and have her read it, and then talk about it. Maybe getting it the natural way, veggies, would be ok too.
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I forgot to mention that while I was busy mopping the other day, my MIL was hollering for me to come and see something on TV. It was a "super mop" system that she wanted to get for me! Boy am I lucky or what! So, as I was hot mopping her bedroom and bathroom, she had a disgusted look on her face due to the "inadequate" mop I was using. Ha!Ha!
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Thank you for all the good information. My MIL is 69 years old. I've printed out the bad reviews/scams for the items that she wants and give them to her, and it does not seem to faze her. She still wants it and thinks she needs it, whatever it is. I've even tried to appease her with knock off brands of some of these things, but she is very brand oriented, so I don't bother trying to find a cheaper version of something. She does take a multi vitaman everyday. I'll take all of your input into consideration. Thank you.
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Gads, TV tripe is pernicious--some is good, but one must ask why spend on exotic stuff, when "Simples" will do nicely..
...and understand, I am a health care professional who spent most of my career in alternative medicine, promoting supplements, correcting dietary etc.
You are right--most of what's seen on TV, can be easily lived without.
Most of what's lining store shelves, can be lived without.

Maybe you can convince her by reminding her that Dr. Oz, even, is promoting things for Industries trying to make money.
And/or, that one or two simple things, cover almost everything, from soup-to-nuts/head-to-foot...like good quality fish oil with high Omega 3's, for instance---using about 4 or more per day, can help brain function, heart/circulatory systems, normalize blood pressure, help skin, eyes, etc.--all with fish oil in large enuf amounts daily.
Simple.
Or, simply using coconut oil--you can google that and get more data than you can read.
Simples.
But more than that, maybe ask her if it scares her to get old?
Even confused elders, fear dying, even ones who have had firm beliefs in afterlife. One of my Gma's believed all her life in afterlife, continuance of Spirit, yet, poised at the threshold of being about to leave the world, she feared it was all hooey. Maybe she was right--none can tell; Some believe they've seen it--I'm one--but those are my own beliefs, and subject to change--as were heres at the 11th hour. AND, she didn't want to miss anything!

Fearing illnesses, aging and death, can prompt all kinds of bad behaviors, as well as buying frenzies of products to help maintain youth/health.
Take another look at her behaviors, in that context--you might find some answers and maybe a solution, if you can carry a conversation with her about it.

Or it might simply be boredom--and too easy access of the money to do it with.

Placebos, better simpler known safe alternatives she can manage herself, limit-setting, removing the checkbook from her access, etc.--all good ideas.
IF she can still process thoughts a certain amount, snow her with data you approve--keep her busy studying on things--reading disclaimers on stuff that's no good, too expensive.

Faking things too much though, I've found, especially with those who still can think straight some--it doesn't work very well, and can backfire on you---because she'll recognize some or all the fakes, then start mistrusting everything you provide or say.
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here ya go for an entre into something evidence based and a little more user-frinedly than PubMed : arthritis.about/od/supplement/a/What-Is-Nopalea.htm
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PS re Nopalea specifically? Its great stuff, but WAY overpriced. Eat cactus instead! Its a lot like green beans in texture. Mexican in tomato broth is just heavenly. If you don't like that, you can get an opuntia supplement for $9.99 plus S&H minus discounts from Swason's.
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Absolutely getting stuff from foods is optimal, there are all kinds of things in them we don't even know about. Fruits and vegetables are loaded with odd little molecules that you've never heard of that are very, very good for us and only a few that may be bad for some people (e.g. canavanine for triggering auto-immunity). I personally drink a little whisky from time to time JUST to make sure I'm getting all the PQQ I need - that vitamin was only discovered a few years ago. (Sure, its in parsley too, but you can only eat so much tabbouleh.) OTOH, there are things than can be beneficial in higher than RDA doses, and only a few things are toxic. B vites except more than 100-200 a day of B6 are pretty safe, extra folate may help hearing a little, for examples. Fat soluble vites need a little more thought and planning; D, A, and K can at least theoretically be overdosed on, and gamma E is probably important if you otherwise get only a multivite with alpha tocopherol, to balance out pro-coagulant effects. Lots of the proprietary fancy expensive formulas have a couple of good ingredients and you can get those cheaper online for the most part. I had a bunch of patients take Protandim and its quite a good antioxidant mix, but again you can do better with good foods and less expensive versions too.

It is well documented now that a "cocktail" of B vites carnitine and CoQ can help in mitochondrial disorders. B6 given with Keppra, and Coq and maybe carnitine given with statins are reasonably effective at combatting side effects. B2, B1, and a few herbs may work for migraines, but YMMV. Petasides (butterbur) actually GIVE me headaches. OTOH, it is also pretty well documented that glucosamine and chondroitin do next to nothing to humans with arthritis, though they may be just great for dogs, (e.g. "Happy Hip" dog biscuits). If in doubt, go into PubMed for detailed info on any specific thing. You may be very suprised at what does and does not work.

I recently heard an interesting view (by interesting I mean I don't personally subscribe to it) that using supplements is sort of like implying God did not know how to make good foods for us to eat, and a Christian person I otherwise respect a great deal espoused that idea and said NO ONE IN HIS FAMILY ever takes any supplements. If you feel that argument is useful, use it! But, I tend to think of them as medicines. Did you know there are anti-inflammatory compounds in the whey fraction of milk? Found that out when I tried to go milk-free on someone's bad Mercola-based nutrition advice. But if you really can't drink milk, then fresh pineapple has bromelain, and you can buy some OTC too, some of the orthopods recommend it regularly instead of Aleve.

OK, now that I'm hungry, ceecee, you can make some of those smoothies for me, sounds yummy. I'm partial to fresh mango with vanilla whey powder, one frozen banana, just enough water, and a pinch of honey. Better and cheaper than Starbucks, BTW.
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