My mother-in-law has pre-dementia. She has started to get irritable lately. Any suggestions? - AgingCare.com

My mother-in-law has pre-dementia. She has started to get irritable lately. Any suggestions?

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She usually is a fun loving person. Just would like some answers on if this kind of behavior is to be expected.
Any help in dealing with this disease would be very helpful.
thank you.

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I wonder if pre-dementia is the same as early dementia, or what the article I just posted above refers to as MCI (mild cognitive impairment).
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BTW, in my life irritability is usually related to one of two things: Lack of sleep (grrr, snap) or depression (grr, snap, boo-hoo). Irritability is not a consistent part of my personality but so far when it comes up it is not related to dementia.
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Has your MIL been given a diagnosis of "preDementia"? I have never heard that term applied to a diagnosis. I have heard of Mild Cognitive Impairment.

In any case, irritability may be associated with dementia at any stage, but dementia doesn't have a patent on irritability! There could be many causes.

If a doctor diagnosed MIL as having pre-dementia, what did he or she tell you to expect? Were you told some things to look for as signalling the entry into dementia? Is MIL on any medications for this condition?

I'm really interested in the concept.
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Please don't just put her on medications. There are many things that should be tried prior to medications.
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I looked up pre-dementia and here is what it says:
Pre-dementia
The first symptoms are often mistakenly attributed to ageing or stress. Detailed neuropsychological testing can reveal mild cognitive difficulties up to eight years before a person fulfils the clinical criteria for diagnosis of AD.[21] These early symptoms can affect the most complex daily living activities.[22]
The most noticeable deficit is memory loss, which shows up as difficulty in remembering recently learned facts and inability to acquire new information.[21][23]
Subtle problems with the executive functions of attentiveness, planning, flexibility, and abstract thinking, or impairments in semantic memory (memory of meanings, and concept relationships) can also be symptomatic of the early stages of AD.[21]
Apathy can be observed at this stage, and remains the most persistent neuropsychiatric symptom throughout the course of the disease.[24]
Depressive symptoms, irritability and reduced awareness of subtle memory difficulties also occur commonly.[25]
The preclinical stage of the disease has also been termed mild cognitive impairment,[23] but whether this term corresponds to a different diagnostic stage or identifies the first step of AD is a matter of dispute.

PREDEMENTIA IS FOLLOWED BY EARLY DEMENTIA
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As Nancy said.. Also make sure you get all her medical and financial taken care of, meaning, she needs POA'S for both which I advise seeing an Elder Law Attorney if she has substantial assets..
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Is it early stage Alzheimer's? She should see her doctor, make sure they check for a UTI which cause all sorts of changes including agitation.
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I'd say 'early' dementia, that makes more sense. If that's the case, then she needs to be seen by a Dr. and get on some meds. They're not going to 'cure' it, but they can slow the progression down. I got lucky, my mother-in-law wasn't very nice to me early in our marriage, but now that she has Alz. she's a joy to be around! ha
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I agree with the above. Pre- Dementia is like saying Pre-Dead. It covers an awful lot of ground. When she moves from Pre-irritable to Irritable, take note of what changed around her, what small thing set her off. Take notes, stare and compare and sometimes, just listen and keep an open mind.
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