My mother is in hospice care, does she still need her Medicare part B? - AgingCare.com

My mother is in hospice care, does she still need her Medicare part B?

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I am paying the room and board for my mother, is it necessary to keep the Medicaid B?

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I pay $300 a month for my husband's gap policy. I am afraid to cancel it because he's been with hospice a year and they could dismiss him. It has happened and I'm afraid to take the risk.
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If she's worked outside the home all of her life, she is due Medicare. Do not cancel that part.
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Can you get it back if he's released from hospice? It does happen. Also, respite care allows your loved one to go into a facility for a few days while you get a break. I'm not sure which part of Medicare pays but it is covered by Medicare.
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Discuss this with the Hospice.
They do bill Medicare as well as other insurance so I would not change anything unless you talked to them first.
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Did she work all her life and pay into the system? Then she deserves to keep it
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from medicare website.
Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance)—Part A covers inpatient hospital stays, care in a skilled nursing facility, hospice care, and some home health care.
Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance)—Part B covers certain doctors' services, outpatient care, medical supplies, and preventive services.
If you cancel Part B, any supplies etc. as Veronica noted or any visit for a condition not related to hospice qualification will not be covered. Check with your hospice provider and see if anything is being done for your family member that would be affected by the cancellation. It's much more difficult to reinstate once cancelled.
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Medicare Part B doesn't pay for medication - that's Part D.
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I would discuss this with the hospice provider.Hospice usually provides the medication needed for the condition the patient is admitted for . For example if she is admitted with heart failure but also had diabetes they will not pay for her diabetic supplies.
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