My Mother (nearly 92) is getting a cataract removed, but she does not notice any impairment of vision. Should she wait? - AgingCare.com

My Mother (nearly 92) is getting a cataract removed, but she does not notice any impairment of vision. Should she wait?

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Don't want her getting unnecessary and potentially complicated risks and surgery if not really needed. Is it better to remove cataracts early, before they grow? Or wait until you really need the procedure?

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True story....

Well known artist known For his visually stunning oil scenes. Brilliant colors and surreal combinations. Very successful.

Realized that he was slowly losing his eye sight. It turned out to be cataracts. He had the surgery. With his new lenses in...he was aghast at the outrageous work he had been doing! Seems he could not see the color very well for a long time, and was using progressly louder and more brilliant color.

He new work was never again met with the avant-garde acclaim he had received in the past.
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Alecarthur,
Your post is at the end of an old thread from last year. I hope that you'll get some responses. If not, you may want to start your own thread, providing more details about your husband's situation.

How is your husband's health, other than the eye condition? I know that there has been discussion on these boards about eye surgery for seniors who have dementia, and it can be difficult to get a person with dementia to cooperate with aftercare after surgery. So, that's always something to consider.

Have you and your husband discussed the risks and options with his doctor? I know that's a big decision. I hope you get some other responses that might be helpful.
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Having read comments, my husband has mac degeneration in one eye, and cannot see forward with it, what about if surgery goes wrong with other eye he is 82. Surely he would be blind! Also severely deaf and cochlear implant. If I die he would be in serious trouble. No reading,t.v.computor, frazzled about should he go ahead. Can still see a beautiful flower.
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Now 84, I had cataract surgery when I was in my early 70s. Although a pre-op sedative was administered, I was required to remain alert and responsive throughout the procedure and follow the surgeon's verbal commands to keep my other eye trained on a blue light. Results were good; requires daily eye drops forever. I just saw that you and Mum have decided to go ahead. It sounds as if she is alert and will be able to follow directions. Maybe -- after all --
I won't mind living to 92, if I get there.
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Thank you so much everyone for taking the time , and your responses..
So appreciate it. Has really helped.
Have decided to go ahead with the cataract removal.
It does get confusing with old people and often too much medical intervention, and money to be made.. And there is not time for a second opinion now, and Mum is keen to go ahead. Thanks again everyone!
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I know a man who ids 97 and just had it done. It is a simple procedure. If she is not diabetic should be no problem. If she is, then there may a problem with healing.
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Get a second opinion, preferably from someone who will not profit from the surgery. If she has no impairment of vision I would walk away, far away.
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Ask her eye doctor. We are not doctors here on this site.
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I agree with Cwillie, and the doctor surely would not want to do it if it would be dangerous to your mom. Like I said, I had it done and you would not believe the clarity and the COLORS. Immediately I saw beautiful colors that were dimmed when I had cataracts.
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I've done a lot of reading on this. It used yo be that the cataract had to get "ripe" before the surgery because of the way the procedure was done, the hardened lens was easier to remove. The technique has changed a lot, and today it is much faster and simpler. I can't understand why anyone would want to wait until they are blind before having it done when you don't have to.
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