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We just learned today that the memory care center our mother is in (a small privately owned company of seven residential group homes) is changing hands. Families are receiving only two weeks notice of the change. What can or should we do? We have already reached out and expressed our concern. We will be researching the new company's history, and we will be highly recommending that five specific employees be allowed to remain if staffing issues are considered. During these times when we cannot visit our mother, this is NOT good news, and frankly we are nervous.

Start by assuming that things could get better instead of assuming things will get worse. It’s not likely the new owners will want to fire staff, especially not right off the bat and definitely not during a pandemic.
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Reply to IsntEasy
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Prayers sent to you at this difficult change.
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Reply to Llamalover47
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You can be nervous and I think we all would. It is difficult when you cannot be present. But I would not assume the worst. The assisted living my bro was in changed hands shortly before he moved in, and honestly only for the better, so try not to assume the worst.
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Reply to AlvaDeer
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Bad enough to have this impending change, but given the virus, it's even more nerve-wracking. On top of that, your profile indicates FL... eeesh!

One line of questions for the new owners would be how they plan to manage staff AND residents (incoming in particular.) If these people have any working brain cells AND a working heart, they would know not to rock this boat too hard. Changing staff and bringing in new residents (if some existing ones either pass or move elsewhere) right now could be a bad thing for everyone involved, including the new owners themselves! At least for the foreseeable future, they should leave staffing alone (at least those who have contact - admin is a different story) and if they bring in new residents, they should be tested and isolated for 14+ days, with additional testing being done.

Whether anyone could sue or not, if the worst happened there because of the virus, their options for getting new residents would likely drop to ZERO!
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Reply to disgustedtoo
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joelfmi118 Jul 5, 2020
The governors of every state especially NYS governor  Andrew Cuomo  whom sent my wife of 52 to her death because he sent  positive Patients from hospitals  during the height of pandemic.to nursing homes and assisted living homes When he had navy medical ship comfort and the javits center that were willing  to take these sick patients  there of treatment. He had infected over 45,000 poor senior citizen whom have died because of his ruthless actions

. Cuomo  and other governors  was given immunity from prosecution  
.Believe me if I could I would sue him in a minute for his criminal action. right now he getting away. with murder.    

Senior  citizen  lives matter . But what he has done is  tadmount  to murder. He must be punihed for his order given to hospital to ship their sick positive  patient to these homes whom had NO PPE, hardly and any aids to treat these patients 
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Take a look at your contract. There is probably nothing you can do but remain flexible.

People usually associate change with loss. Maybe some of the changes will be positive. You are not without choices—if you decide you don’t like the new situation, you can make a change that is best for your loved one.

The fast turnaround is probably related to the terms of the sale. If you had notice earlier, you probably would only be worried longer.

During these Covid times, businesses are closing left and right. Care facilities have experienced extra financial stress and hardship.
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Reply to ACaringDaughter
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The new owner ought to have contacted residents and their families a) to introduce themselves and b) to outline any changes that you might expect. If they haven't done this, or at least aren't planning to do it pretty quick, that in itself is not a good sign. When you say you have reached out, whom did you contact?
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Reply to Countrymouse
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You can probably take some comfort in the timing of this. Nobody wants to be interviewing and hiring right now. They'd be idiots to move staff and/or patients out of the facility and try to replace them. Necessary workers may need jobs, but the management types who do the hiring are probably still quarantined at home.
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Reply to SFdaughter
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One of the ways to research is to find out what other facilities the company owns, if any then go to the Medicare website they have ratings of different facilities and they have comments on how or what caused a bad report.
I would not jump to conclusions until you have done some research.
I am sure that staff that wishes to stay on will but they probably will have to pass new drug testing, background checks and other requirements if the information in the personnel file is not current or complete.
On the up side you may not notice a change.
On the sown side if there are problems I hope that it will be easy to transfer your mom if you need to. If you have to sign a new contract see if there is a way that you can review after 30 or 60 days.
(I do not know what the contracts are like for a facility or if they are renewed like an apartment lease would be for example)
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Reply to Grandma1954
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Weeble Jul 1, 2020
This is helpful info. Thank you. We have a conference call with the. Ew owner tomorrow and we’ll be sure the matter of a new agreement will come up. It’s nerve wracking, but one thing I’ve learned is that even though a loved one is in care, the worry, stress, oversight and details never stop.
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During the course of my parents care I’ve dealt with an assisted living/memory care facility, two rehab centers and now for my dad a skilled nursing facility. I’ve been lucky, other than some minor issues my folks have been taken care of very well.

However elder care is a cutthroat corporate business. Even the nicest places are understaffed and underpaid. Good luck trying to research these places. I tried when my folks place was bought out by a larger corporation. All I could find was a confusion of corporations owning or leasing various aspects of the businesses. One owned the land, another the building who leased it back to the other guys who hired a company to manage the facility etc., etc.............

When our place got sold there was no huge shakeup that I could see. But pretty soon top administrative people changed who I did not like as well. I had developed a good relationship with the original folks.

If you read all the paperwork you have signed it’s all unilateral language. The company can do pretty much as they chose, charge what they want and change anything at anytime.

I appreciate the facilities that cared for my folks but I think it’s one of the great failings of our country that we put so little importance on ensuring quality elder care. The industry PR folks crank out the stuff about the razor thin profit margins and the burden of gov regulations but if you do a little reading on the matter you’ll see that the big guys and knocking down some big bucks and many states hardly know where their nursing homes are much less regulate them.
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Reply to Windyridge
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Weeble Jul 1, 2020
They own one add’l assisted living community so will start researching either away. Thank you!
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Very sorry.  Make certain you have copy of anything that you or mom signed.   If you do not, call office now for copy.   New company will likely try to cut care, increase prices so stay on top of.
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Reply to FloridaDD
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A stressful situation, esp in these times when you cannot be boots on the ground!

Sounds like a small enough facility that you family members can make sure that the transition is as smooth as possible. I think the idea of recommending 5 specific employees is a good one.

Just hold tight and try to keep the lines of communication open. I would imagine that the new owners would want to keep what works--working.

Good Luck. How impaired is your mom? I would be more concerned about what this will do to her...but if the same CG's are in play, she likely won't notice a difference.
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Reply to Midkid58
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