Mom's house has sold and she has Alzheimer's. Should we take mom to closing or just go ourselves and sign the document?

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my sister and my brother all have equal dpoa, my mom's house has sold, she has alz , is that sufficient to sign for her. she know she can not stay in her home, but is sad to leave, should we take her to closing or just go ourselves and sign doc.

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No, no no - do not take her. I also struggled with this decision. I do not know how bad your mom's dementia is - but they do not process things normally any more. She may not even remember that you sold her house and then refuse to sign the papers. You want this to go smoothly right?

I didn't know what to do, but confided in staff at the day center she attended and they said "no" do not take her. Later, I know I did the right thing. She has so much emotional attachment to her home, that I think it would of been to painful for her. Also, after I sold her house, she asked me later what house I sold - referring to her home as a child. That clarified to me that I did the right thing.
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I would get the advice of an elder law attorney. You never know what glitches may come up, if any.
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When we sold out horse farm we held an auction and we choose not to be there. When we left the UK many years ago we had an auction house take our surplice belongings and put them in one of our auctions. What upset me the most was reading through the list and the sums they had sold for. Reading that was a big mistake - should have just deposited the check and forgotten all about it. I did not mind parting with the stuff as it was a company move and we had the choice of buying new here or having everything shipped. We were excited about buying new so it was no great loss.
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I think it would be too upsetting to see her home being sold even if she has dementia that way there is nothing to remember and be confused about it.
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I remember ages ago being at a real estate closing where for whatever reason the buyers didn't get a babysitter for their children. There we were with a 1 year old, 5 year old, and 6 year old. There was crying... there was screeching... toys were being thrown... "can we go home now" after 5 minutes.

Oh how I wished I could have asked the parents if it would be ok if the 2 older children went out in the hall and played with the elevators :P

I was a nervous wreck after that closing, so I doubt an elder would be able to survive that.
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When my mom moved in with me she had an auction on all her belongings. She went to it and it was the worst mistake we ever did. She has dementia and the one thing she remembers is watching all her belongings go. I hear it all the time about that but what she doesn't remember is signing the paperwork for the Auction and meeting the Auctioneer. She claims he just did that on his own. Its really sad. Nobody has POA so her house is still sitting empty. In the process of getting Guardianship. Good luck.
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No. I left my husband at home and signed with the DPOA. Title company did call him and asked if DPOA was still in force and I alerted caregiver to have him prepared to answer. So much easier than sitting through closing and confusing the issue.
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NO! there will be enough to do without the distractions. As long as you are the POA and have proof of her inability to deal with her personal business. There is absolute no need to take her to closing.
Just make sure all your T's are cross and I's are dotted. Organization is the key. Make sure you have "all" the paperwork in order, call the closing company and ask them what paperwork you must bring. This will be a daunting task, I should know I have been through it.
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Gladimhere - Not to worry, even if she could talk. Both DPOAs are in place and they would have the last say. An incompetent person cannot execute real estate documents.
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No do not take her! What if she decided in her confusion to back out?
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