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She's lost the memory of the previous several hours too. This has happened about 4 times. Sometimes she will recover her memory of the previous few hours, but several times she has not. I think she is waking from a deep sleep and is disoriented and confused. It is very disconcerting for her and she is frantic for a while, and then calms down. She doesn't appear to remember to much about it after the event, but when it happens again she remembers that it has happened before. She never slept during the day before, and this usually (not always) happens when she sleeps during the day. Is this something caused by her dementia, her age, something else? Her medications have not changed, so I would rule that out. It's a new development and it is very disconcerting for all.

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She is still in assisted living, and doing fine. The facility is privately owned and much more flexible with their residents. The owner came and talked to me and Mom while I was there this morning. We discussed the possibilities of a TIA, low blood sugar, low iron or UTI. All possibilities. I spoke with her doctor's office and didn't get much help there. She has a scheduled appointment the first week of February, but we could get her in earlier to see the nurse practitioner. But I opted to wait for the visit with the doctor. It would only be an additional week and I don't think would make much difference unless something changes with Mom. The owner of the AL suggested a home health care group that she loves - they have a male RN who specializes also in psychiatric issues. He has helped several of the residents there adjust medication, etc. when they have had problems. He can recognize some things that a regular RN might not see. He can draw blood and make recommendations to the doctors. He's covered by Medicare, so I think we will go that route. It would be wonderful to have someone check on her regularly without having to get her out for a doctor visit. Definitely going to check into it. Would also like to check into getting her on some sort of anti-anxiety/anti-depression medication. She's very sensitive to any changes in meds, but it would be good to talk to someone about that, also.
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Is she still living at Assisted Living? If so, what do they say about how she is functioning? Can she remain there? I would discuss these incidents with her doctor, of course. I might ask the doctor about medication to help her with anxiety, if these events are causing her to be anxious.
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We know she has dementia, and I have always felt it was vascular dementia because of major blockages in her carotid ateries. I thought that perhaps she was having TIAs. Thank you for responding! I never know if I am conjuring up things that might be wrong with her. She is 93 and living in an assisted living for some time now, and they are wonderful. Most of their residents have mild dementia, or other issues so they are very good with their residents. She will remember this incident for a little while, then forget as she has forgotten the other incidents. Thank you again. I already have a call into her doctor and this gives me more confidence to suggest this possibility.
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What you describe are classic symptoms of TIA's (transient ischemic attack) which is a fancy way of saying mini-strokes. Keep a log of dates, times, and how long this lasts. Share that log with her MD at office visits. He may refer to this as "vascular dementia" and want her to have an MRI or CT. She can no longer live alone, or be left alone; the risk is too high.
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