My mom with dementia (for 6 years) had sudden urinary incontinence, not just leaking? - AgingCare.com

My mom with dementia (for 6 years) had sudden urinary incontinence, not just leaking?

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like before, but seeping through her Depends and needing a new one every few hours whereas before it was just overnight for light leaking. So checked for UTI and she did have one. Treated with Keflex, finished course 3 days ago but her urinary incontinence has not stopped. Does anyone know how long after the antibiotic course it takes for this to resolve? Should it have by now? She also had an episode of fecal incontinence this morning (never had this before, either). I know people with dementia can sometimes become incontinent, but it was so sudden. I don't feel like she far enough along to have this. Am I wrong? I am hoping this isn't a permanent thing.

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Thank you, everyone. Definitely seeing her doctor this week. It does worry me that it was so sudden. I don't think she has fallen. She lives with me and I telecommute so I'm with her 24/7 basically. Interesting about the cough medicine possibly causing UI -- that's something I will never give her for sure. This is NO fun....for her OR me.
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I definitely would check with her doctor. By any chance is she taking a cough medicine that contains dextromethorphan? That ingredient can cause sudden urinary incontinence.
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Certainly, check with her doctor, but, my loved one was double incontinent within a few months of her diagnosis of vascular dementia.
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I would take her to a doctor ASAP; there could be other factors causing this. You might even try going directly to a urologist and bypassing a primary care doctor.

This sudden change bears immediate consideration and investigation.

If you can't get in to see any of her doctors ASAP, I'd try the ER. They can do more tests, more quickly.

There are some conditions that are affected by spinal disorders, which is what I'm wondering about. Has she fallen recently or injured her lower back?
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My Dad started with the incontinence a year or so before his dementia became apparent. For him it was mobility issues, not being able to get to the bathroom on time. And at night, not being able to get out of bed quick enough. Thank goodness for Depend Guards at the beginning, and later a Depend pullups.
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Being fully incontinent does not usually go away once it starts. You should alert the MD if she has diarrhea, because a long course of antibiotics can lead to C-Difficile problems in the gut or thrush in her mouth.
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